Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce Retail social media sustainability technology

ICYMI: Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton, Instagram launches IGTV, H&M’s flagships

Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton
Virgil Abloh for Louis Vuitton

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week, including Virgil Abloh launching for Louis Vuitton.

TOP STORIES
  • Over the rainbow: Virgil Abloh makes historic Louis Vuitton debut [BrandChannel]
  • Instagram celebrates its 1 billion user mark with launch of YouTube rival IGTV [TheDrum]
  • How H&M is rethinking its flagships [BoF]
  • 3 ways personalization can save brands from the retail graveyard [VentureBeat]
TECHNOLOGY
  • This AI program could beat you in an argument – but it doesn’t know what it’s saying [TechnologyReview]
  • Marks & Spencer partners with Microsoft on artificial intelligence initiative [WWD]
  • Performance-based marketing gets blockchain makeover [WWD]
  • You too can be a “Westworld” AI with this new Alexa game [FastCompany]
SUSTAINABILITY
  • Asos to ban silk, cashmere and mohair from its website [BBC]
  • Stella McCartney unveils sustainable shop with ‘cleanest air’ in London [Independent]
  • MPs launch inquiry into the sustainability of the fashion industry [TheIndustry]
  • How Parley for the Oceans became fashion’s go-to environmental non-profit [Fashionista]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • 22 experiential stores NYC has to offer [RetailDive]
  • M&S should be “looking seriously” at Amazon tie-up says former digital boss [Retail Gazette]
  • IRL stores are doing it for the ’Gram [Racked]
  • How Depop is catering to Gen Z and millennials to get an edge over resale competitors [Glossy]
  • Farfetch’s Black and White program shows slow growth [Glossy]
  • Retailers, malls staving off Amazon with help from OneMarket [WWD]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YouTube hires Derek Blasberg to head fashion partnerships [TheCut]
  • Aerie rapidly gaining market share off social media and ‘more authentic’ women [CNBC]
BUSINESS
  • Chanel publishes annual results for first time in 108 years [NY Times]
  • Amidst consolidation wave, Acne Studios could fetch €500m [BoF]
  • Kering to sell Christopher Kane back to designer [BoF]
  • Google to invest $550 million in China e-commerce giant JD.com [Reuters]
Categories
mobile social media

Harper’s Bazaar launches Emojis 2.0 app, nods to key brands and fashion personalities

harpersbazaar_emojis_anchor

Converse shoes, Hunter boots, Chanel bunny ears and a Birkenstock sandal are among some of the new emojis released from Harper’s Bazaar magazine in time for the fashion week season ahead.

The US-based publication has introduced over 40 new icons to the collection on its dedicated iPhone app, with further references made to fashion personalities including Cara Delevingne and Derek Blasberg, as well as on-trend items such as denim dungarees and a fedora.

There’s also a specific illustration of the waterfall in front of the Lincoln Center (which is home to Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York from September 4-11), as well as things like kale, iced coffee, a low-battery sign and more.

The app is sponsored by fashion brand Equipment, accordingly also including five Equipment-specific emojis. It was designed and developed in partnership with SixAgency.

BUNNY EARSPUDDLE JUMPERCARA DELEVINGNEEQUIPMENT EARN YOUR STRIPESNEED JUICEOLD SCHOOL KICKSOVERALLSSTRAPPED IN

 

Categories
Uncategorized

BoF – AW11, the season that was

Imran Amed of The Business of Fashion always provides a great overview from an industry point of view on the catwalk season that was.

Just a week post Paris, and his autumn/winter 2011/12 round-up is in.

With the Galliano story dominating headlines around the world, both within fashion circles and out, it’s unsuprising Amed’s intro starts with somewhat of a “bitter” note. “Looking back, several of the most salient themes from this round of fashion weeks involve unsavoury behaviour, gossip and highly unprofessional comments from some of the industry’s most important figures,” he says.

He does however go on to highlight  the clothes (focusing on outerwear and prints), the growth of consumer participation and high profile clients in shows, the role of immediacy versus exclusivity (one of my personal favourite debate points at present), and the growing intensity of street style “paparazzi”.

“Think before we tweet”, is a particularly relevant point for this blog. It reads:

It seemed like just another fashion month, and then, with the high-profile meltdown of John Galliano, everything changed in a matter of hours. Soon, the fashion gossip mill was in a frenzy, turbocharged by Twitter which made the whole situation more ugly as the days went by and speculation about Galliano’s successor intensified after he was first suspended, and ultimately dismissed by LVMH.

A tweet by Derek Blasberg from backstage at the Katy Perry concert in Paris, citing an anonymous source which ‘confirmed’ the widespread rumour that Riccardo Tisci would be named Galliano’s successor set off further speculation on websites and blogs, who sometimes took Mr. Blasberg’s comments as though they had come straight from an official Dior press release. I found at least one website that took the Tisci rumour and reported it as fact, without any mention of the source at all.

But Mr. Galliano wasn’t alone. Rumours about the futures of Stefano Pilati, Hannah McGibbon, and Christophe Decarnin dogged designers and lit up the internet throughout Paris Fashion Week, creating a virtual feeding frenzy of immense proportions. We were an industry feeding on ourselves.

So dear fellow members of the fashion Twitterati, let’s think before we tweet. Careers and businesses can be impacted by what may seem like an innocent bit of speculation on Twitter, but can quickly turn into boldfaced headlines on major fashion websites, a hugely destabilising force at the most critical moments during the fashion calendar. We are all still learning how to use this powerful tool responsibly.

Check out the rest of the BoF post, here: Autumn/winter 2011 – the season that was