Categories
data Editor's pick

Data visualisation dress maps human displacement at London’s Science Museum

Dress For Our Time
Dress For Our Time, by Professor Helen Storey MBE RDI

With every piece of data out there today, there is – more often than not – a human story behind it. That’s the idea behind Dress For Our Time, an installation unveiled at the Science Museum in London that delves into the global refugee crisis and the complex matter of human displacement in a bid to change the social narrative of the topic.

Created by award-winning artist and designer, Professor Helen Storey MBE RDI (London College of Fashion, UAL Centre for Sustainable Fashion), the dress itself is a decommissioned refugee tent that once housed a family in Jordan. It was gifted to the project by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

Projected onto it is an animation formed of 80,000 individual points of lights, each of which represent 100 human lives and the movements they’ve made around the globe, as per UNHCR statistics collected during 2015. That’s eight million lives in total.

Developed by creative technology agency Holition, the data visualisation aims to show the true human element of the crisis, creatively mapping the journeys people are making in search of a better life.

Head over to Forbes to see a video of that data in action and read the full story about the project.

Categories
data e-commerce Editor's pick

Net-a-Porter showcases real-time shopper trends in digital out-of-home campaign

netaporter-CW

Data visualisation continues abound with news of Net-a-Porter’s new out-of-home campaign showcasing live shopper trends from around the world.

Hosted on an Ocean Outdoors screen in Canary Wharf, London, the initiative brings to life purchases taking place on the luxury e-commerce site as they happen in real-time. Running as an extension of the Net-a-Porter Live project hosted online, it presents imagery of the exact pieces being bought as well as the specific country the customer is transacting from. There is also a live count of shoppers online.

Leila Ratnani, international account director at Havas Media, who managed the creative concept and execution alongside PSI and Liveposter, said: “Since its launch last year, Net-a-Porter Live has set the brand apart from its luxury retail competitors and raised the bar for online customer experiences. Being able to further bring this campaign to life via digital out-of-home is a great opportunity for the Net-a-Porter brand and its followers alike.”

The campaign will be in place for two weeks. It is Net-a-Porter’s first foray into outdoor advertising.

Categories
Blocks business data e-commerce Startups

Lyst’s ‘big data’ visualised in projection mapping from Holition

Lyst_holition_projection

With an inventory of over one million items from more than 9,000 global fashion designers and retail stores, not to mention a solid group of actively purchasing consumers (a record $10m in sales was generated in a recent month), it might come as no surprise to hear Lyst has also got a lot in the way of data.

The once social curation site, now e-commerce platform, recently showcased that fact in collaboration with Holition.The latter created a projection that visualised the vast amount of data Lyst receives daily, in real-time. As per the video below, it documented around 250,000 items of clothing and accessories on the screen at any one time. Prices were shown, as were brands, combined designed to enable the viewer to understand and spot popular trends.

This “engaging and colourful piece of digital art”, as Holition refers to it, was on show at Lyst Studios, the company’s headquarters, in Shoreditch, London.

Said Holition CTO, Russell Freeman: “[Lyst] sucks up a huge amount of information every day and we wanted to be able to visualise that in a really beautiful way.”

Lyst, which launched in 2010, has also just announced what it refers to as a “complete brand refresh”. A new logo, a content-led homepage (as below) and a redesign across desktop, tablet and mobile are included. Working in partnership with creative agency Wednesday, the company has introduced a new aesthetic that it refers to as “modern, bolder and more distinctive”.

Chris Morton, Lyst CEO and cofounder, said: “We’ve spent much of the last four years focussed on building a deeply engaging product that delivers a truly personalised shopping experience for each of our millions of users around the world, and that’s now generating very meaningful sales for our partner brands and stores globally. I’m delighted that we have now been able to turn more attention to our brand, with this new identity and content based homepage forming the first of several exciting brand- led initiatives in the coming months.”

The move comes off the back of the aforementioned successful sales figures as well as the fact the company is on track to grow 400% year-on-year for the third year in a row. Its universal checkout launched in 2013, which enables shoppers to buy from different fashion brands and stores in one basket on Lyst’s website and mobile apps, is reportedly behind the growth.

Lyst_redesign_homepage