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business e-commerce Editor's pick Retail Startups technology

4 innovative retail fulfilment methods to know

The on-demand economy has fueled consumer desire for instant gratification. Products and platforms ranging from Airbnb and Uber, to Seamless or Deliveroo, have resulted in growing appetite in the market for convenience and immediacy on virtually anything and everything we can dream of today.

Needless to say, that has therefore filtered over to retail, with mega corporations like Amazon only feeding the notion that we need access to products within the same or next day – leaving little option but for other businesses to follow suit.

By 2021, over 2.14 billion people worldwide are expected to buy products online, reports eMarketer. A core aspect of the purchasing decisions that come with this is speed of delivery. According to McKinsey & Co for instance, 25% of consumers would pay a premium to receive products same day.

This of course presents logistical challenges. The cost of global delivery amounts to €70billion a year, according to McKinsey, with the last mile portion of that being the biggest challenge to fulfill efficiently. As a result, numerous logistics businesses have been scrabbling to offer the right kind of solutions for their clients. Over the next five years, 78% of them are expected to provide same day delivery, and within 10 years, 39% anticipate two-hour delivery, reports Zebra Technologies.

In a bid to be competitive, luxury has picked up on it as well. Farfetch now offer 90-minute delivery in 10 cities globally for instance, while Net-a-Porter is also striving to improve the shopping experience by offering its top tier a ‘You Try, We Wait’ same day service.

There are many others experimenting with their own methods alongside. Here are four areas of innovation within the delivery space we’re currently tracking…

CROWDSOURCED DELIVERY

The last mile of fulfillment is the most expensive and time consuming part of the delivery process, but numerous startups are looking to disrupt this space by enabling anyone to have anything delivered on-demand by trialling such areas as crowdsourced delivery. 

Similar to the structure of Uber, this allows individual couriers to deliver parcels straight to your door, or facilitate them for pick-up or drop-off around individual homes and offices. Crowdsourced delivery is expected to be adopted by 90% of retailers by 2028, according to a report by delivery company Roadie.

One e-commerce company currently trialling such a scheme is Zalando. This allows people to volunteer their homes as pick-up and drop-off points in Scandinavia. Primarily intended to benefit the customer, it also enables self-employed, retired or stay-at-home parents to earn some extra income.

ROBOTIC POSTIES
Ford Delivery Robot

McKinsey & Co predicts that more than 80% of parcels will be delivered autonomously in the next decade. The thought of robots walking around town beside us may seem a little futuristic, but many companies have already successfully tested them.

Postmates is intending to roll out a new autonomous delivery robot in Los Angeles later this year, for instance. The self-driving rover, named Serve, uses a camera, light detector and sensor to safely navigate the sidewalk. This can create a virtual picture of the world in real time and communicate with customers via an interactive touch screen. Serve is part of Postmates’ vision of a world where goods move rapidly and efficiently throughout cities.

Ford meanwhile is experimenting with a package carrying robot that will be able to walk, climb stairs and deliver your parcel to your front door. In partnership with Agility Robotics, the robot – called Digit – can successfully carry a 40lb package.

DRONES
Amazon Prime Air Service

Next up is autonomous urban aircrafts, otherwise known as drones. This could become a $1.5 trillion industry by 2040, according to Morgan Stanley Research.

Amazon has been leading the way in the space for some time with its Prime Air service, which is under constant experimentation. Its latest announcement said consumers will be able to get parcels delivered within 30 minutes or less by drone, thanks to a sophisticated ‘sense and avoid’ technology allowing it to safely maneuver in the sky. Executive Jeff Wilke stated that between 75%-90% of deliveries could technically be handled by drones in the future.

Strictly speaking, however, when that will be is still unclear. While the technology is improving constantly – using a combination of thermal cameras, depth cameras and sophisticated machine learning – there remains the small issue of authorization. Regulation is continuing to evolve, with a recent test moving things forward in the US market, and further developments happening in Europe, but Amazon’s view of commercial drone deliveries ready within just a few months, seems unlikely.

It’s not alone in trying however. Wing, a drone service from Alphabet – Google’s parent company – has completed a successful trial in Australia and is now doing so in Finland. Similarly, UPS is currently testing drones for the use of medical supplies and samples in North Carolina. Its long term plan is to eventually roll out the drones for the industrial, manufacturing and retail markets. UPS is another that has applied for a Federal Aviation Administration certificate that it hopes will allow it to operate the drones on mass.

ALL ACCESS
Waitrose While You’re Away Yale Technology

In a bid to combat the fact so many parcels see unsuccessful delivery attempts due to the absence of the recipient, there are also numerous experiments in the market to get around the need for humans to be present when the action takes place. This is especially being considered in the online grocery market, which is expected to grow 52% over the next give years to £17.3billion, meaning investments in home deliveries will need to be expanded.

One example we’ve seen comes again from Amazon, which has developed a system that allows couriers to deliver parcels to a customer’s car. The Key-In-Car service is available for all Prime members with a Volvo or General Motors vehicle dated after 2015. Through encryption, the courier can unlock the trunk without needing a key. This is available in 37 cities across the US. Similarly, Skoda is developing a technology that allows delivery firms one-time access to the trunk of the car. The biggest challenge to this opportunity is the threat of security. The risks can be mitigated however by couriers wearing body cameras and sending photographic evidence upon delivery, but retailers must gain consumer trust in the process first.

British supermarket Waitrose, part of the John Lewis Partnership, has gone even further by testing a ‘While you’re Away’ service in south London. This initiative gives delivery drivers a unique code that gives them temporary access to the customer’s property, allowing them to put away the shopping on their behalf. The lock technology has been developed by Yale and will be free to install for customers. To give them piece of mind, each driver will indeed wear a video camera to record their steps, which the customer can request access to.

How are you thinking about innovative delivery solutions? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Get in touch to learn more. 

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Editor's pick Podcast product Retail sustainability

Meet 5 disruptive direct-to-consumer brands

Ask any direct-to-consumer brand and the answer is clear: the death of retail is greatly exaggerated.

Throughout the year, the Innovators podcast by TheCurrent Global spoke to some of the top businesses disrupting the markets they’re in to uncover the secrets to their success.

The one thing they seem to have in common is finding an industry that has long been left untapped, and focusing on a single product category – whether it be shoes, luggage, underwear and more. But they’re also winning by bringing in strong elements of community, having a sustainable story at their heart and launching into physical retail.

Here are our top ones from this year’s podcast episodes:

HEIST
Heist’s Toby Darbyshire and Rachel Arthur

In April, TheCurrent Global spoke to Toby Darbyshire, CEO of UK-based hosiery brand Heist Studios, on how the brand is innovating such a traditional category. “It struck us that in the age of Harvey Weinstein, the fact that my wife, who is a pretty modern woman, walks into Selfridges’ underwear section and it says ‘listen love, put this on – one of sort of four or five societal normalized views of sexy – and then you can fulfil your purpose’. That seems like an industry at its fundamental that is both broken from a brand point of view but also totally out of kilter with the cultural discourse,” he said at the time.

Heist plans on fixing the industry by placing a large focus on its product development, which begins at the customer and how they feel about tights, to product innovation that takes cues from other industries, such as sports, to better understand the performance and wear of textiles. 

Listen here

CASPER
Liz Bacelar and Casper's Eleanor Morgan
Liz Bacelar and Casper’s Eleanor Morgan

Mattress brand Casper is arguably one of the category’s biggest success stories, said to be worth over $750m today, with plans to open over 200 retail locations over the next three years. Today, brands should be deploying three different tools to achieve a successful retail experience, said chief experience officer Eleanor Morgan: trial, service and entertainment.

The brand, which introduced the mattress-in-a-box experience to American homes and beyond in 2014, now paves the way for digitally-native brands that are transitioning from online to offline spaces. Its stores, most recently the Dreamery space in NY, don’t focus on inventory availability and convenience. Instead, the focus is giving customers the ability to enjoy moments with the brand, which involves more practical elements such as try-on and expert consultation.

Listen here

NADAAM 
Liz Bacelar and Matt Scanlan, Naadam
Liz Bacelar and Matt Scanlan, Naadam

Cashmere brand Nadaam has built its entire business on relationships, said founder Matt Scanlan. “There are fundamental shared experiences across the human experience that we don’t think about when we’re making clothing; that we don’t think about when we’re trying to look nice” he told co-host Liz Bacelar earlier this year. 

Since inception, Nadaam has focused on building a strong bond with the communities that trade raw materials that become its products. That was an important factor to establishing a more sustainable supply chain, and part of a plan to build the biggest platform he could in order to share his message. Consumers are ready for this, he said, which only helps drive his message forward. During the conversation, Scanlan also talked about why 100% sustainability is both fake and impossible, and the challenges of growing such a brand. 

Listen here

AWAY
Jen Rubio and Liz Bacelar
Jen Rubio and Liz Bacelar

Travel brand Away never wanted to be another Silicon Valley story that was showered with VC money and failed to deliver. In order to ensure longevity, it never pitched itself as a luggage company, but rather a brand aiming to make travel more seamless. Such was the approach that the business received its first round of investment before ever having a physical product.

These days, Away’s mindset of creating a lifestyle rather than a single-product brand is exemplified by a travel magazine called Here, several successful collaborations with everyone from model Karlie Kloss to basketball Dwayne Wade and a slew of physical stores that sell beyond the simple suitcase. 

Listen here

ALLBIRDS
Tim Brown of Allbirds with Rachel Arthur
Tim Brown of Allbirds with Rachel Arthur

Footwear label Allbirds was conceived on the idea of creating a simple shoe that had two main focuses: sustainability and comfort. The aim was two-fold because according to co-founder Tim Brown, people don’t buy solely based on a brand’s sustainability credentials, but whether the product itself does what it says on the tin.

During this podcast conversation, Brown also honed in on the importance of businesses taking a responsibility in ensuring a greener future, rather than expecting the consumer to do it themselves. He also talked about the fact the brand has been making strides in product development that aligns with its ethos of sustainability: it recently launched a new flip flop range made with renewable sugarcane soles, the “recipe” of which is open source so other industry names can join in.

Soon after the episode was initially published, Allbirds took its mission online with Meet Your Shoes, a platform that showcased the provenance of the wool and tree styles. For wool, for example, users can read the ‘sheep dossier’ and even pet individual sheep as they stroll across the screen in a video. 

Listen here

Catch up with all of our episodes of the Innovators podcast by the Current Global here. The series is a weekly conversation with visionaries, executives and entrepreneurs. It’s backed by the Current Global, a consultancy transforming how consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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Editor's pick product

Heist’s new shapewear comes from the inventor of the Speedo SharkSkin suit

The Outer Body by Heist Studios

Three years after taking on the hosiery market with its reimagination of tights, Heist is moving into shapewear with a bodysuit inspired by the wearer’s own support system.

Called The Outer Body, the undergarment is meant to support the body instead of squeezing it, and it’s a big push in innovation that’s making that viable. Behind the design is performance-wear inventor Fiona Fairhurst, who is renowned for the multi-gold-medal-winning SharkSkin swimsuit for Speedo.

With her first product release for Heist, she is combining two cutting-edge fabric technologies. The first, NoSew™, allows the garment to have just one sewn seam, eliminating discomforting bulky seams. The second, FlowFree™, features engineered perforations that promote and enhance breathability instead of retaining moisture like traditional elastics and meshes.

“Traditional shapewear puts pressure all over the body, which might work, but it’s not comfortable. I didn’t want to touch it the same way, I wanted to support the body, not necessarily control it”, said Fairhurst at a launch event for the product in London.

The bodysuit is composed of ultrasonically bonded, contouring, breathable panels made of film technology modeled on the body’s fascia matrix – the connective tissue beneath the skin that stabilizes the muscles and internal organs. 20,000 tiny laser-perforations increase airflow to reduce sweating.

According to Heist’s CEO, Toby Darbyshire, the company is on a mission to change the future of underwear. “Women’s bodywear has been neglected, overlooking an important scientific and technological focus that it deserves. With this new launch, we have applied our philosophy of innovation and expert knowledge of the anatomy to a very specific product that has been crying out for an overhaul.”

Before creating the shapewear, Heist asked 1,025 women who wear bodysuits what they wanted most from the product. “This disillusioned and dissatisfied group told us: no squeezing, sweating, or struggling into something that’s not worth it. So, we applied high-performing technology to our bodysuit from top to bottom”, said Darbyshire.

The company also launched an amusing campaign, as its marketing style, to tease the shapewear, with various comedians attempting to get into more traditional bodysuits to varying degrees of difficulty. I don’t think women should have to compromise when it comes to shapewear. I’ve designed for comfort – this is a new product you can move in.” Fairhurst explained.

Considering the global underwear market is expected to reach $145bn by 2021 after generating sales of $112bn in 2016, according to Statista, it’s about time the industry started paying attention to innovative, female-targeted products.

The Outer Body is priced at £120 and available online today at www.heist-studios.com. A limited supply is also available in-store at the Heist DemoStudio in London, where customers can book a 30-minute Shape + Fit appointment via Instagram.

For more on how Heist approaches innovation – from product to communications – listen to TheCurrent Innovators podcast episode with Darbyshire, published earlier this year.

How are you thinking about product innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
Editor's pick product

Heist uses crowdsourced data to launch inclusive line of tights

Heist Studios
Heist Studios

Heist Studios has announced the release of five new tights in a variety of nude shades as a result of crowdsourced data from over 1,000 women. The new additions will add five new shades to Heist’s current line of nude tights when released later this week.

The diverse colour palette was sourced from “The Nude Project”, a crowdsourcing effort for which Heist created a dedicated microsite where it is asking women globally to share their own unique “nude” skin tones. Launched back in 2017, the project aims to create an ongoing range that reflects the needs of its audience accurately, says the brand.

“We know from our customers that women shy away from wearing nude garments for the most part because, with only a limited range of shades on offer, they are unable to find a suitable match,” says Heist. “We saw the furore around Meghan Markle’s tights at her first royal engagement as Duchess of Sussex, with the press lambasting the shade of nude. Our extended range seeks to solve this problem.”

Heist Studios
Heist Studios

The new range will be available to purchase from July 30 in the UK market in sizes ranging 4 to 14, while an extended sizing range from 16 to 24 will be released in October.

By launching the range in a wider variety of both shades and sizing, Heist continues to make strides towards inclusivity and diversity, which have been at the core of its DNA since inception. Additionally, reflecting its consumers’ voices in both product and advertising allows the brand to remain a strongly authentic voice in the market.

The strategy has allowed the UK-based company to quickly position itself as a true disruptor in both direct-to-consumer retail and the hosiery category itself, as CEO Toby Darbyshire told us on TheCurrent Innovators podcast in April. 

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Editor's pick Podcast product technology

FOREO on driving meaningful innovation in the beauty device market

Paul Peros and Rachel Arthur
Paul Peros and Rachel Arthur

Applying innovation to every aspect of a product or service is at the core of beauty device company FOREO’s strategy, from product design to discoverability and communications, says CEO Paul Peros on the latest episode of TheCurrent Innovators podcast.

The Swedish brand entered the market in 2013, when the concept of beauty tech was just beginning to bubble up, and move from the professional salon space to selling at retail. What became clear however was that the company had to strive not only to introduce a new technology into the consumer’s home, but educate them on how that type of product would fit into the context of their lives.

Listen here: Apple Podcasts | Android | Google Play | Stitcher | RSS

Peros explains that for the the at-home beauty device industry to become truly mainstream, brands need to not only offer efficacy at a professional level, but convenience that matches consumer expectations. He refers to this as “meaningful innovation”.

“You cannot ask a consumer to adopt a completely new practice or new product that stands in [their] way,” he explains. “You cannot have products where the consumer services the product rather than the other way around.”

The brand has engaged directly with consumers from the get-go, which initially started as a necessity as the company lacked the resources to play in the traditional media game. However, it quickly became a vital part of its business model, helping it reach the estimated $1 billion in worldwide sales that it’s expecting to hit in 2018.

“At the end of the day this has become an advantage that helped us not only reach the consumers but to engage with them and learn how to evolve our product range and our communications,” says Peros. At CES in January 2018, for instance, FOREO turned to Kickstarter to launch the UFO, a spaceship-like device that enables consumers to do a facemask in under 90 seconds (as opposed to the typical 15-20 minutes).

Foreo UFO
Foreo UFO

Unlike traditional campaigns on the crowdfunding platform that seek funding as their primary goal, the company saw this as a chance to spend months engaging with the consumer and gathering important feedback before bringing the product to launch.

Doing so has enabled it to drive engagement with a fiercely loyal beauty consumer, leading FOREO to experience exponential growth around the global. The five-year-old company now employs over 3.000 people in 20 offices worldwide.

Also in this episode, Peros talks further about the secret to developing products for a consumer that lives a much faster life, and just how the beauty industry is finally getting the innovation it deserves.

Catch up with all of our episodes of TheCurrent Innovators here. The series is a weekly conversation with visionaries, executives and entrepreneurs. It’s backed by TheCurrent, a consultancy transforming how consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
business data e-commerce film social media Startups technology

What you missed: digital realities at fashion week, lessons for retail, M&S on data

digital realities
At NYFW, 13 designers introduced Intel’?s immersive runway experience powered by VOKE?s TrueVR platform

The see-now, buy-now fashion week circus continues, wrapping up in New York and onto London. All eyes on the Burberry show as that takes place this evening, but before that a round-up of all the other bits you might have missed including J. Mendel’s Instagram Stories show, Hood by Air’s collaboration with PornHub and the role virtual and mixed reality are playing this season.

Also hitting the headlines has been everything from the first Bread & Butter by Zalando attracting 20,000 consumers, and M&S sharing detail on how data and technology can drive innovation and growth. Don’t forget to check out our full list of upcoming events at the bottom too…


TOP STORIES
  • Virtual reality hits NYFW [BoF]
  • Hololens’ mixed reality to transform London Fashion Week show [Forbes]
  • With shoppable runway shows, fashion brands court millennials [Bloomberg]
  • The real action at fashion week is on your phone screen [WSJ]
  • The influencer you use may be ripping you off [Inc]
  • Millennials prefer to deal with companies by text [BetaNews]

BUSINESS
  • First Bread & Butter by Zalando attracts 20,000 consumers [WWD]
  • Everlane: The San Francisco clothing company that launches t-shirts like they’re iPhones [Quartz]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • J. Mendel’s fashion show was on Instagram [Glossy]
  • Hood by Air collaborated with PornHub at New York Fashion Week [The Cut]
  • Bloomingdale’s gamifies in-store shopping through Snapchat filters [Luxury Daily]
  • Pinterest studies how to supercharge fashion content [WWD]
  • This GucciGhost installation might be the best Instagram moment of NYFW [Fashionista]
  • Facebook Messenger adds buy button, native payments [ZDnet]

ADVERTISING
  • Kate Spade does ‘see-now, buy-now’ with a new video starring Zosia Mamet [Fashionista]
  • Etsy’s first global campaign is an expression of individuality, just like the stuff it sells [AdWeek]

RETAIL
  • 7 lessons for retail in the age of e-commerce by Rachel Shechtman of Story [BoF]
  • 4 fashion brands that are getting creative with shoppable video [Digiday]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Your next pair of shoes could come from a 3D printer [NY Times]
  • This high-tech suit lets you feel things in virtual reality [Quartz]
  • Richard Hewitt of M&S on using data and technology to drive innovation and growth [Internet Retailing]

START-UPS
  • Fashion start-ups are crowdsourcing critical business decisions. Is it working? [BoF]

UPCOMING EVENTS
Categories
digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: wearables, Net-a-Porter and Yoox, Facebook messenger, live-streaming apps

A round-up of the latest stories to know about surrounding all things fashion and tech…

wristwatches

  • The wearables road ahead: a race to the bottom? [TechCrunch]
  • Net-a-Porter, Yoox merger creates online fashion powerhouse [WGSN.com/blogs]
  • You can now pay your friends through Facebook Messenger [Mashable]
  • Will new live-streaming apps change the way we see fashion week? [Style.com]
  • Marketers weigh in on Periscope vs Meerkat [AdWeek]
  • LVMH’s Tag Heuer surfs wave of smartwatch partnerships [Reuters]
  • Kenneth Cole reveals Connect smartwatch line [BrandChannel]
  • Harrods takes its green-clad doorman global with Instagram contest [Luxury Daily]
  • Inside Balmain’s digital revolution [BoF]
  • Why Sephora’s digital boss joined Stitch Fix, the personal stylist startup that’s growing like mad [re/code]
  • Banana Republic harnesses photographed ‘Hot Dudes Reading’ in Instagram campaign [PSFK]
  • The North Face hopes to rope you in with virtual-reality rock climbing [Chicago Tribune]
  • L’Oreal’s chief digital officer on programmatic plans, start-ups and org charts [AdAge]
  • Meet Betabrand, the company that’s using viral humour and uncensored crowdsourcing to create the future of fashion [Medium]
  • Will personalised pricing take e-commerce back to the bazaar? [BoF]
  • Social media’s elusive goal: return on investment [WWD]
  • How beauty and fashion brands can win on Instagram [Fashionista]
  • Online fashion retail in India may touch $35 billion by 2020 [The Economic Times]
  • Are ‘smart’ clothes the wearables of the future? [re/code]
Categories
Blocks social media

Topshop to give Facebook fans first look at part of #LFW collection

Topshop has partnered with Facebook this season to drive what it is referring to as its “most socially accessible fashion show to date”. Certain looks from the new spring/summer 2015 Topshop Unique collection will never take to the runway itself, but instead be presented over Facebook immediately following the show.

This “social catwalk” will see fans having the first look at some of the pieces in the line; indeed before the celebrities and editors in attendance.

Said CEO Sir Philip Green: “This season, the strength of our social community allows us to be the first brand to debut looks from a catwalk collection on a social network granting unprecedented access online. I believe that enabling Topshop’s fans to view key looks from the collection before our industry insiders is a real revolution – and one that we are proud to pioneer.”

The British retailer will also make six pieces from the collection instantly available to buy in its Oxford Circus store in London, as well as online for delivery in a few days.

Instagram also plays a part in the Topshop strategy this season, with five popular ‘grammers chosen to curate and populate its channel throughout LFW, including @wethepeoplestyle, @thefashfeed, @anasbarros, @olivialsr and @tilfrances. The content from these “social narrators” will additionally feed directly to Topshop.com, as well as to the Oxford Circus store windows where a digital mosaic will be in place featuring all the images on a custom-built triple-screen installation from British design duo Hellicar & Lewis.

Fans are encouraged to contribute to this too by tagging their own shots on Instagram with #topshopwindow. And it doesn’t end there – those walking by will be able to interact with and manipulate the images (open and enlarge tiles on the screen) with their body movement in front of the window. They will also be able to watch the live stream of the show from the same spot, as well as online, when it takes place on Sunday, September 14 at 3pm GMT.

Categories
e-commerce Editor's pick film social media

Levi’s celebrates stories of a “billion jeans” on new #liveinlevis digital platform

Sandrine_Tonye

Levi’s has launched a digital platform set to host everything from shoppable videos to consumer-generated imagery as part of its new Live in Levi’s global campaign.

Created in partnership with AKQA, the microsite is designed to serve as a living lookbook or a showcase of the brand’s jeans being worn around the world. It will combine storytelling with social media and e-commerce, aiming to engage and activate its global community based on the idea of shared experiences.

“Nearly everyone in the modern world owns, or has owned, a pair of Levi’s jeans,” says Stephen Clements, executive creative director at AKQA. “The global ubiquity of the brand and the diversity of people’s style is what we wanted to celebrate. It’s something no other brand can claim.”

Indeed, the tagline for the campaign reads: “A billion jeans. One-of-a-kind stories. This is how the world lives in Levi’s.”

Anchoring the initiative at launch is an interactive shoppable film. Featuring influencers including Sleigh Bells frontwoman Alexis Krauss, through to street-style star Julia Sarr-Jamois, it invites users to further explore each individual story at any point while watching. Access is then provided to photo galleries, product information, videos and links to shop the look.

“The people who wear Levi’s have always been the inspiration for our brand,” says Jennifer Sey, CMO for the Levi’s brand. “This innovation is a way for us to open up our legacy and invite participation from all over the world by allowing users to shop for iconic Levi’s products highlighted in the film.”

In an earlier interview with The Drum, she explained: “We were inspired by all the letters we receive from consumers and so we just wanted to create and facilitate a space for the stories they are already telling about Levi’s. I would say the three goals of the campaign are to assert the brand’s denim leadership, to tell authentic self-expression, which is really our point of differentiation, and to put the brand back at the centre of culture again as opposed to on the fringe.”

The film was shot in New York, London, Paris, Tokyo and Shanghai in collaboration with editorial and production company, Monster Children.

Fans are invited to contribute to the project with their own Levi’s moments by using the hashtag #LiveInLevis across social platforms. The results will be curated by Levi’s and paired with a relevant product that users can click to buy. A certain level of localisation will also occur as content is created and promoted relevant to specific markets.

liveinlevis1

Julia_Sarr_Jamois

Thomas_Bushnell

Zhu_Jiejing

Himm_Wong

 

Categories
Editor's pick social media

Calvin Klein expands #mycalvins campaign to incorporate denim

calvin-klein-jeans-f14-m+w_ph_mert+marcus_sp06

The #mycalvins social media campaign from Calvin Klein Underwear, which encouraged followers to upload photos of themselves wearing their branded smalls on Instagram, Twitter or Vine, has been going strong since February 2014.

According to the company, “thousands” of posts (we heard circa 7,000 to be precise) have engaged over six million fans and reached over 200 million of them from more than 23 countries.

Now, that same initiative has been expanded to denim. For autumn/winter 2014/15, the Calvin Klein Underwear and Calvin Klein Jeans campaigns have been brought together, featuring the familiar faces of Lara Stone and Matt Terry. Shot by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott, the duo are portrayed in black and white, with the #mycalvins hashtag also featured, highlighting how intrinsic it has become to the campaign.

Indeed the hashtag will be pushed prominently across print, digital, and outdoor advertising executions as well as in-store, on hang tags and at point of sale. Furthermore at retail, the campaign is set to expand with the call-to-action: “Put it on. take it off. show yours. #mycalvins”

As with the original launch for underwear, a series of celebrities and digital influencers are continuing to be engaged, posting their own shots with the hashtag too.

Also worth checking out: the recent #CKmeforme campaign via Snapchat and Tumblr.

calvin-klein-jeans-f14-w_ph_mert+marcus_sg02 calvin-klein-jeans-f14-w_ph_mert+marcus_sg01 calvin-klein-jeans-f14-w_ph_mert+marcus_sg03