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ICYMI: Reinventing the checkout line, fashion’s data war, the void of the pop-up experience

Retailers are re-inventing the checkout line
Retailers are re-inventing the checkout line

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • How retailers are reinventing the checkout line [BoF]
  • Fashion’s data war [WWD]
  • The existential void of the pop-up ‘experience’ [NY Times]
  • Mulberry launches interactive retail experience for the holiday season [TheCurrent Daily]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Alibaba and Amazon move over, we visited JD’s connected grocery store in China [TechCrunch]
  • Ford and Walmart to partner on self-driving deliveries [Engadget]
  • How retailers can tell stories by reading emotions [RetailDive]
  • New York Is a genuine tech hub (and that was before Amazon) [BoF]
  • Walmart is using virtual reality to train its workforce for Black Friday [Vox]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • Big names from fashion, music and art team up for #PassOnPlastic pop-up [The Industry]
  • Kering Foundation unveils campaign against cyberbullying [WWD]
  • Avon fights for LGBTI rights alongside the United Nations [Fashion Network]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Talk to me: The rise of voice commerce [WWD]
  • Denim tailors and t-shirt tattoo parlours: Inside Levi’s New Times Square flagship [BoF]
  • Chinese shoppers crave experiences with their bags, LVMH says [Bloomberg]
  • FAO Schwarz puts a new spin on its dance-on piano as part of splashy NYC comeback [CNBC]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • How brands are finally realising the full potential of personalization [Marketing Week]
  • These are all the problems with Iceland’s banned Christmas advert [Wired]
  • John Lewis unveils Christmas ad and experiential store activations [Fashion Network]
  • A third of brands admit to not disclosing influencer partnerships [Marketing Week]
PRODUCT
  • Gucci expands DIY service [Fashion United]
  • Clinique bets big on personalized moisturization [WWD]
BUSINESS
  • Beyoncé buys out Ivy Park brand from Philip Green [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Five lessons fashion can learn from Disney [BoF]
  • How cannabis became chic [i-D]

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Blocks business data e-commerce

Data helped Clinique win with ‘spotted eggs’ campaign

clinique

This is an incredibly simple but effective demonstration of data being used to inform a media and marketing buy.

Clinique ran a campaign a few years ago for its Even Better Clinical Dark Spot Corrector, and used eggshells with spots on them as a point of comparison for what happens to the skin over time.

Unsurprisingly, it bought search terms against it relevant to the product and its properties, one of which was ‘hyperpigmentation’.

What it swiftly recognised however, was that a lot of the traffic it was receiving from Google came instead via words like ‘spotted eggs’ and ‘freckles’.

“Needless to say that wasn’t in our media buy,” said Emily Culp, former VP of digital/consumer marketing and media at Clinique, now SVP of e-commerce and omnichannel marketing at Rebecca Minkoff. Speaking at the Shop.org Summit in Seattle this week, she added: “Our key term was hyperpigmentation, which is marketing speak. Few people would know that was what it was called, so didn’t know to search for it. We needed to think more like the consumer, so we started bidding against egg farmers.”

“The volume and velocity of data today is mind numbing. It can be incredibly overwhelming. But sometimes, if you’re creative with your data sources, it can actually be very simple,” she explained.

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technology Uncategorized

Digital billboards in Times Square, New York

American Eagle and Forever 21’s digital billboards in New York might have been written about numerous times before, but seeing them firsthand is quite another experience, so I couldn’t help but get my camera out.

Forever 21's interactive billboard at Times Square

Forever 21’s is the epitome of interactive. Using high-tech surveillance equipment and computer vision technology, it plays on the notion of vanity (who doesn’t like to see themselves on a 61-foot screen) to form a real-time image of the crowd.

A super-sized virtual model can be seen taking a Polaroid photo of onlookers before showing it to them once developed; picking up an individual and either turning him into a frog by a kiss or dropping him into a shopping bag; or placing a magnifying glass over certain groups.

The campaign, created by interactive agency Space150, even picks up on the yellow of the Forever 21 bag, to specifically pick out those that have shopped in the store. Bearing in mind consumers look at billboards for an average of six seconds normally, this one definitely has people captured for a couple of minutes at a time – and that’s a whole year after it first launched.

Check out the video, below:

Meanwhile, American Eagle’s similarly taps into the “15 seconds of fame” idea. It’s been about for a little while longer (first trialled in November 2009), but continues to fare well. Anyone who buys something in store can opt to have both their photo and a message posted to the multiple giant screens, some 25-storeys high, outside.

It all happens within 15 minutes so there’s not too much hanging around in the meantime, but while you wait, there’s also conveniently a rotation of all the current campaign shots too.

Check out the below slideshow of examples:

And a couple of other related things I loved…

The fashion ads from Pepsi for its new skinny can, also in Times Square:

Clinique’s digital vending machines at JFK airport: