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e-commerce Editor's pick technology

CES 2018: Ford and Postmates teaming up for self-driving shopping deliveries

Ford and Postmates
Ford and Postmates

Retail deliveries made in self-driving cars got a step closer to reality at CES in Las Vegas this week.

Ford announced it has partnered with delivery service Postmates to begin a pilot program testing how its self-driving vehicles and on-demand delivery might work hand in hand.

The two will explore how self-driving technology could change the delivery experience for consumers, enable brick-and-mortar retailers to reach new customer bases, and transform the way commerce moves in the communities in which we operate. A big focus is on how to benefit small businesses.

“The way commerce is moving around in cities is dramatically changing, and emerging technology will undoubtedly have an impact on the future of on-demand delivery,” Sherif Marakby, Ford’s vice president of autonomous vehicles and electrification, said in a post on Medium. “With the knowledge we’ll gain from our partnership with Postmates, we anticipate we’ll be able to better deploy self-driving technology in a way that can help people get what they need faster, while also supporting local businesses that are a big part of communities around the world.”

The test will include a pilot in a city yet to be announced, where Ford will eventually launch a fleet of self-driving vehicles.

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product sustainability technology

CES 2018: This jewelry collection is made from gold mined from Dell laptop parts

The Circular Collection jewelry from Nikki Reed and Dell (Pic via Engadget)
The Circular Collection jewelry from Nikki Reed and Dell (Pic via Engadget)

Device recycling just reached a whole new level thanks to a partnership between Dell and actress Nikki Reed.

The duo have teamed up to launch The Circular Collection, which is a line of jewelry made from gold mined from old or broken laptop parts.

For every million cell phones recycled, 35,000 pounds of copper, 772 pounds of silver, 75 pounds of gold and 33 pounds of palladium can be recovered, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

In this case, there’s sufficient quantity to create delicate rings, earrings and cufflinks for Reed’s sustainable-focused Bayou With Love brand. The collection is completely sourced from the recycled electronics that Dell collects, as announced at CES in Las Vegas this week.

Dell is mining gold from old and broken laptop parts
Dell is mining gold from old and broken laptop parts

According to Dell, it takes approximately six motherboards to produce a single piece of jewelry. It will also use recycled gold in new motherboards in its Latitude 5285 computers shipping in March. Dell says it aims to use 100 million pounds of recycled material in its product portfolio by 2020.

“At Dell, we pride ourselves in finding better, more efficient ways to do business, particularly throughout our supply chain. Materials innovation – where and how we source things like plastic, carbon fiber and now gold for our products – is increasingly important for us,” said Dell’s vice chairman, Jeff Clarke, in a press release.

The jewelry will retail at $78-$348. Said Reed, who is best known for her role as Rosalie Hale in the Twilight movies: “I wanted to create pieces that could be worn every day,” says Reed. Another form of upcycling is passing down jewelry from generation to generation… we wanted to create pieces that could be worn beyond our lifetime.”

The Circular Collection jewelry from Nikki Reed and Dell
The Circular Collection jewelry from Nikki Reed and Dell
The Circular Collection jewelry from Nikki Reed and Dell
The Circular Collection jewelry from Nikki Reed and Dell
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Editor's pick product technology

CES 2018: L’Oréal’s latest UV sensor is designed to look like nail art

L'Oréal's UV Sense
L’Oréal’s UV Sense

L’Oréal has unveiled UV Sense at CES this week, a battery-free wearable electronic that provides consumers with individual information of their ultraviolet (UV) exposure through a small design worn on the nail.

The product will launch for dermatological skincare brand La Roche-Posay this summer. It has been created in collaboration with visionary designer Yves Behar, founder of fuseproject, and comes from L’Oréal’s Technology Incubator.

“L’Oréal research shows that overexposure to UV rays is a top health and beauty concern of consumers worldwide,” says Guive Balooch, global vice president of the incubator. “With this knowledge, we set out to create something that blends problem-solving technology with human-centered design to reach even more consumers who require additional information about their UV exposure. Whenever we develop a new technology, our goal is to make an enormous global impact by enhancing consumers’ lives.”

He adds: “Beauty trends show that adoption of wearable nail art accessories is on the rise, with a more than 65% increase in nail art trends over the last five years. Our innovation taps into this growing trend, while illustrating our deep commitment to sun safe behavior and protection.”

The launch follows the first stretchable skin sensor measuring UV exposure from the group unveiled at CES in 2016, called My UV Patch. Since then, La Roche-Posay has distributed more than one million patches to consumers in 37 countries free of charge to encourage sun safe behaviors.

This new launch follows feedback from users showing that although they changed their behaviour – 63% reported less sunburn, 34% apply sunscreen more often and 37% try to stay in the shade more frequently – they wanted a smaller wearable with longer wear and real-time data.

UV Sense is less than two millimeters thick, nine millimeters in diameter and designed to be worn for up to two weeks on the thumbnail, compared to just several days for My UV Patch. It can also store up to three months of data.

It is powered by the user’s mobile phone and activated by UVA and UVB rays. An accompanying app translates and transfers data from the sensor using Near Field Communication (NFC) enabled technology.

“Design and technology are inextricably linked, and as products become more personalized to individuals, both elements are integral to providing people with seamless experiences,” says Behar. “By working with L’Oréal, we are able to pair deep expertise in beauty tech with an effective design that enhances consumers’ wellbeing without distracting from their everyday lives.”

Both UV Sense and a new limited-edition redesign of My UV Patch draw from research L’Oréal conducted in conjunction with MC10 Inc, a leading wearable technology company, and professor John Rogers at Northwestern University, through his portfolio of intellectual property (IP) and innovation around flexible, stretchable electronics.

They will both be available via www.laroche-posay.us on a limited basis in the US for the 2018 summer season with a global launch following in 2019.