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7 ways fashion brands are harnessing hologram technology

We all remember the vision of Tupac being brought back to life by hologram technology during Coachella in 2012. 

Divided though opinion was, the interesting fact lay in the advance of the tech itself. Today, it is entirely possible for life-like constructs to be achieved in 3D so as to be visible to the naked eye. And more to the point, increasingly in a cost-effective way too. 

Today, it is estimated that the holography market will be worth $5.5 billion by 2020.

Fashion is one industry that has been experimenting in this space for some time, using holograms as both elaborate marketing techniques, as well as more immersive in-store opportunities aiming to drive brand engagement. 

Here are seven of the most interesting examples we’ve seen released over the years…

Alexander McQueen
Kate Moss hologram

In 2006, Kate Moss became the first human hologram to be featured as a part of a major fashion show. Alexander McQueen presented the 3D rendering of the supermodel as the finale of his ‘Windows of Culloden’ show in Paris. The hologram of Moss in a flowing white gown appeared out of nowhere to the audience from inside an empty glass pyramid following an elaborate puff of white smoke. The model danced for a few seconds before shrinking and dematerializing.

This iconic hologram, designed by video maker Baillie Walsh and directed by Lee McQueen himself, has become an iconic moment in fashion history and as such even saw revivals in 2011 and 2015 at the Savage Beauty Exhibits, dedicated to McQueen, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London respectively.

Diesel
Diesel SS08

In 2007, contemporary denim brand Diesel took the concept one step further from McQueen’s show the previous year by creating the biggest holographic fashion show to date for its Summer 2008 collection in Florence. The ‘Liquid Space’ show incorporated holograms that were created using the Pepper’s Ghost effect, an optical illusion that uses angled glass and hidden spaces, the technology for which was provided by tech specialist company Vizoo.

The campaign centred around marine creatures in space and used hologram technology to merge 2D projections of a high definition multi-screen video of the creatures with the real life models. The video images? were projected onto multiple transparent screens while careful lighting illuminated the catwalk with little or no scatter on the holographic screens. The virtual and real life elements on the catwalk consequently appeared as one to the audience.

Pinar&Viola
Pinar & Viola hologram

Dutch artists Pinar&Viola also used hologram technology to project an entirely virtual fashion line onto real life models in 2016 at their Amsterdam Fashion Week show. The occasion was designed to prompt emotions about clothing and encourage consumers to reconsider their rate of consumption in order to reduce wasted resources. The show was created in collaboration with AMFI student Amber Slooten and inspired by the mixed reality concepts of companies like Magic Leap and Microsoft’s HoloLens. Its aim was to explore how a future of holographic garments might work. 

The technology also allowed each piece of clothing to be animated through the allocation of characteristics such as eyes and mouths to further emphasize the conscious theme and help viewers to greater connect with the clothes despite them being inanimate.

Ralph Lauren
Holographic Ralph Lauren

The 2018 GQ Men of the Year Awards saw another first on the holographic medium front as pioneering designer Ralph Lauren beamed in via the medium to accept his ‘Design Lead of the Year’ award. The innovative concept was also created in celebration of the brand’s 50th anniversary. The realistic installation was created by Cinimod Holograms and used a staged box located away from the stage to create the theatre. The concept enabled the real life presenter at the awards to stand alongside and interact with Ralph’s hologram in a highly realistic and entertaining way for the audience.

This spectacle followed a series of other hologram integrations by the brand in previous years, including holographic window displays of sparring boxers in its Fifth Avenue flagship in New York in 2017 to promote the release of the new Polo Sport line, and the virtual spring 2015 Polo Womenswear show back in 2014  in Central Park.

Nicholas Kirkwood
CyFi walking at the Nicholas Kirkwood show

Footwear designer Nicholas Kirkwood is another that has utilized holograms by incorporating them in his inaugural London Fashion Week show in September 2018. Current Global worked with the brand to strategize the theme of the show, enhancing its cyber-reality theme by showcasing innovative visual technologies and integrating the experience of “white-hat” hackers in the presentation.

The result also saw a number of 3D hologram displays integrated throughout the show venue in order to enhance its underlying message of non-conformity. Created by tech company, Hologrm, they presented an animated 3D version of the collection’s main boot with neon detailing.

Wrangler
Wrangler’s immersive pop-up

US denim brand Wrangler also recently got on board with holograms, marking its Wrangler Icons launch with a 360-degree immersive pop-up experience that incorporated musicians and actors as well as numerous uses of the technology. The London experience paid homage to the brand’s musical heritage and iconic star-studded clientele from across the years. 

A continuous hologram feature was used to modernize the initiative, as well as helping to link the music theme back to the brand’s western image. A small black room at the back of the space appeared at first glance to house just drums and speakers however, broadcasted on top of the various instruments were holograms of dancing Wrangler cowboys wearing jeans and cowboy hats. The futuristic projections ran on a loop throughout the duration of the event.

Cartier
Cartier holographic watch

Of all of the fashion brands that have used holography over the years, luxury jeweller Cartier has perhaps one of the longest standing relationships with the technology. Back in 1972 the brand generated a lot of attention through its projection of a diamond bracelet dangling from an elegant wrist onto the Fifth Avenue pavement from its store window, which aimed to entice customers in. The piece, which was created by artist Robert Schinella, elicited so many enquiries that it was later revived again in 1979.

Cartier has also harnessed other forms of holograms as the technology has developed over the years, including a virtual craftsman working at a physical station at the Tokyo National Museum’s Cartier Exhibition in 2009, and a store windows campaign in 2015 where a hologram story mapped onto a physical watch face showing the inner workings and intricate parts involved in a watch.

How are you thinking about new technology? The Current Global is a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion, luxury and retail. Our mission is to solve challenges and facilitate change. We are thinkers and builders delivering innovative solutions and experiences. Each of the rules referenced above is matched by one of our products and services. Interested in how? Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
e-commerce social media

Report: Luxury brands in China trail behind in digital proficiency

Burberry in China has fully harnessed all types of available digital channels
Burberry in China has fully harnessed all types of available digital channels

Chinese luxury shoppers are possibly the most tech-savvy and digitally friendly consumers in the world. In order to cater to the shopping habits of this group, many luxury brands in China have recently developed a digital strategy that includes opening stores on local e-commerce giants like Tmall, JD.com and Secoo, and launching e-shops on WeChat. However, a new report by ContactLab and investment company Exane BNP Paribas suggests there has not been major progress made by luxury brands in China in improving their digital proficiency over the past two years. This failure to advance has impeded brands’ ability to reach out and deliver an optimal digital experience for Chinese online shoppers.

Their report, “China Online Boom: Yet to come for Ostrich Luxury Brands”, studies the digital strategies of 32 major Western luxury brands in China to understand how they perform online to benefit their businesses. The study evaluates each brand based on a list of criteria, including localisation (language, website, display), customer digital engagement (outreach, store finder, product presentation), and cross-channel services (online and offline integration), among others.

The findings suggest that the pace of digitalisation of Western luxury brands in China is slow, as only 21 surveyed brands out of 32 have established e-commerce mono-brand websites in the country, versus 31 out of 32 in the United States and 30 out of 32 in the United Kingdom. Because of this, this year, the report downgrades the digital proficiency of these luxury brands operating in China by 9 percentage points from the previous year’s level to just 46%.

Digital proficiency by luxury brands operating in China has fallen to 46% from 55% in the previous year
Digital proficiency by luxury brands operating in China has fallen to 46% from 55% in the previous year

The report names the British luxury powerhouse Burberry, followed by the American fashion brand Michael Kors and fine watch and jewelry maker Cartier, as three outperformers. Burberry in China has fully harnessed all types of available digital channels. It has a Chinese official website that is highly localised for Chinese customers. It also has opened stores on Alibaba’s Tmall, JD.com, Secoo.com and 5lux.com, as well as launched an online boutique on WeChat. The brand has also made substantial efforts in offering high-quality customer service and style advisory through phone and social media channels, as well as integrating online and offline shopping experiences. Burberry’s wide e-commerce footprint is in contrast with its rivals, such as Gucci, Prada, Hermès and Louis Vuitton, which have not yet established any direct e-commerce.

On the e-commerce front, the study also notes that, in general, Western luxury brands that are willing to sell through this channel tend to go to platforms such as JD.com, Secoo.com and 5lux.com, but keep away from launching flagship stores on Tmall and boutiques via WeChat. One explanation could be that many luxury brands still find it hard to work with Alibaba, as their businesses in China have all, to some extent, suffered from the counterfeit phenomenon on that platform.

When it comes to the level of localisation, Coach, Hugo Boss and Ray-Ban are leading, followed by Armani, Burberry, Cartier, Dior and Michael Kors. A high level of localisation requires a brand to pay attention to things such as language and currency, and establish official presence on major Chinese sites such as Baidu, WeChat, Weibo, and Youku. Meanwhile, local celebrities and fashion bloggers also play a significant role in helping to localise the brands. For example, Burberry has been working closely with Chinese singer and actor Kris Wu, while Cartier uses singer Lu Han to promote its products.

The availability of “style advisory” is also used as a benchmark to measure brands’ digital performance. Under this category, French fashion house Dior was named as having the best practice via offering an online chat service (in Chinese) to customers with product suggestions. Louis Vuitton offers a similar service via phone and SMS, while Brunello Cucinelli does it via email. Digitally savvy Michael Kors, Cartier and Burberry all provide the service through social media platforms, namely WeChat and Weibo.

In addition, some brands have recognised the importance of mobile payments in the shopping process of Chinese customers. The study discovers that Alipay and cash on delivery have been widely enabled, while European brands, including Ferragamo, Chanel and Dior, also allow customers to pay via WeChat wallet.

The integration of online and offline channels is still in the beginning stages in China, according to the report. To name two pioneers aside from Burberry, Bulgari allows customers to pick up items ordered on WeChat in store, and Coach offers online and in-store product exchange services.

Overall, luxury brands in China still have a long way to go when it comes to fully taking advantage of opportunities in China’s digital sphere. The authors of the report said: “It is less than ideal that digital luxury is still dominated by local champions,” as those Western brands who currently have progress to make in their e-commerce presence need to keep in mind that the Chinese consumers they’re looking to attract are “young, tech savvy, and eager to embrace change.”

By Yiling Pan @SiennaPan

This article was originally published on Jing Daily, a Fashion & Mash content partner.

Categories
Editor's pick film

The best of the rest of this year’s festive film campaigns

Christmas holiday festive film fashion
Warehouse’s #TheGirlsRoom Christmas campaign

The holiday season has become a big opportunity for retailers and brands to create a deeper emotional connection with their customers at a pivotal time of year for spend. 2016 continues much in the same way, powered by big launches including a message of female empowerment from M&S with Mrs Claus, another iconic nod from John Lewis with Buster the Boxer, and a big cinematic piece from Burberry.

Whether the intention is to encourage happy tears or just have your audience laugh, brands are stepping up to the challenge of showing a strong sense of self, and conveying a powerful message in the process, all in a bid, of course, to drive some of that all-important Q4 revenue in their direction.

Read on for our pick of the best campaigns across the fashion and retail space in Europe and US this year (beyond those already mentioned), as well as a bevvy of further ones to know about below…


Mulberry: It’s What’s Inside That Counts

Mulberry tugs at the heartstrings for the holiday season with an endearing story of love and acceptance played by child actors pretending to be grown-ups. The two-part film, which was shot in the British countryside in Surrey, tells the story of a traditional Christmas where three siblings return to their childhood home to spend the holidays with their difficult mother. As the story unravels, secrets and problems come to light. At the end of Part I, in an act of generosity, one sibling gifts her sister her much loved new Bayswater bag, in a realisation that “it’s what’s inside that counts”.

Directed by Albert Moya and written by Hugo Guinness (The Grand Budapest Hotel), it explores a deeper meaning of accepting each other for who they are. As Johnny Coca, the label’s creative director, explains: “When I was a kid, all that I wanted to do was to be grown up so I could be like my dad. Now that I am an adult, I just want to be a kid again! Christmas brings out the kid in all of us, and this is what I love about using children to tell our story this year.” The second and final version, which shows the family coming to terms with each others’ faults and weaknesses, premieres later this month.


Macy’s: The #SantaProject

The tagline for Macy’s holiday campaigns has long been about the idea of “Believe”. For 2016, they’ve turned that into an exploration of whether children today do indeed believe in Santa Claus. Cue a series of seriously cute clips featuring young kids sharing their thoughts on the miracle of Christmas, before a reminder message of the sort of realities they’re faced with when turning to the internet to search out the truth instead. It’s a positive note revolving really around kindness with what we post online, which let’s face it, can be applied to all parts of life, especially after this rocky year.


Rebecca Minkoff: Holiday My Way With @arielle

Rebecca Minkoff teams up with Vine star Arielle Vandenberg to tell the story of an independent woman trying to navigate the holidays by herself as she decides to stay in the city for the first time, and not go home to see her family. Each video, or chapter, focuses on a different achievement as the main character stumbles into adulthood, from decorating the apartment, to hosting a Friendsgiving, alluding to Thanksgiving as well.

Rebecca Minkoff, the designer herself, makes a cameo as a friend disappointed with the (clumsily wrapped) gift she receives from the main character. On other platforms, the #holidaymyway hashtag is being used to promote a Christmas gift guide and additional marketing content.


Harrods: A Very British Bear Tale

Seemingly inspired by Disney’s Frozen, Harrods tells an animated tale of a young teddy bear serving as the only (snuggly) survivor when an ice storm takes over the palace thanks to a mischievous elf. Hugh, as he’s called, comes to the rescue by climbing to the rooftop in order to signal help from Father Christmas in the North Pole. As the narrated story continues, the spell is broken and Hugh ends up crowned a prince thanks to his courage.

In addition from Harrods this season, is A Very British Fairy Tale in partnership with Burberry; a stop motion short made from paper cutouts.


Coach: A Holiday Film Starring #RexyTheCoachDino

Coach continues its good-humoured approach to luxury with a holiday film starring its now beloved mascot, Rexy the Coach Dino. The film shows what happens at the label’s New York City workshop after hours, when one rogue Rexy leather dinosaur comes to life. Aiming to wreak havoc, the dinosaur runs free pushing over boxes, breaking baubles and generally creating a mess, all while dancing – by herself – to the soundtrack of Billy Idol’s “Dancing with Myself”, as sung by The Donnas. As the sun rises, Rexy spots an open window and sets herself free, roaming the streets of the city independently.


Kate Spade: Make Magic Happen

Kate Spade’s short but sweet spot, starring model Jourdan Dunn and stylist Catherine Baba, features a small cameo by the iconic Miss Piggy. Shouting over the spot in a possessive manner, “Mine! Mine! Mine!”, the fabulous Muppets’ character attempts to keep all handbags to herself. The campaign also promotes the designer’s latest collaboration, with Miss Piggy herself. The holiday line includes wallets, phone cases, and accessories with the character’s “Who, moi?” catchphrase.

Speaking to WWD, Miss Piggy talked of her excitement to join the great group of women associated with the brand: “Moi was already a big fan of Kate Spade New York’s Miss Adventure’s series. I mean you see all these fabulous and incredibly strong and wonderful women like Anna Kendrick and Zosia Mamet having fun. So, I thought: I’m fabulous, incredibly strong and wonderful, I need to be part of this. When I discovered they wanted to create product inspired by moi: Well, it was a done deal.”


Target: The Toycracker

Target is betting big on its holiday campaign with an eight-minute musical titled The Toycracker, a cheeky take on the Nutcracker classic that reimagines the Tchaikovsky soundtrack as a modern hip hop track. Developed by ad agency 72AndSunny, the spot stars singer John Legend as the Rat King, his wife, model Chrissy Teigen, as the Nutcracker and Isabella Russo (The School of Rock) as Clara. This year’s popular toys, such as Trolls and Teenage Ninja Mutant Turtles, have replaced classic characters such as the Sugar Plum Fairy and toy soldiers, while the play’s famous sword fight scene will be told as a rap battle.

The full musical will air in two four-minute spots during ABC’s network premiere of the film Frozen on December 11 in the US. Meanwhile, the brand has launched behind-the-scenes footage of the night of the musical in the shape of a trailer, starring the Bullseye dog and a young girl, Marisol, as well as toys that have come to life to work on the production. The campaign will be supported by further marketing activity that includes a Snapchat filter and a “10 Days of Deals” promotion.


Farfetch: The Holiday Remix

For this Christmas season, Farfetch is presenting a remix of all things festive with a shoppable video that takes on a modern twist of the Nutcracker story. The e-tailer worked with choreographer Dana Foglia, of Beyonce’s Formation fame, to create a modern-day version of Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy, with dancers donning this season’s best partywear.

When watched on Farfetch.com, the video allows customers to shop by displaying circles over certain garments, thanks to a partnership with touchable video platform Cinematique. Clicking the circles will showcase more information about the outfit, and allow users to add to a basket and checkout at the end.


Warehouse: #TheGirlsRoom

Warehouse continues its ‘Resolutely British’ reinvention, under the helm of newly appointed creative director Emma Cook, with a video campaign that celebrates what happens in the girl’s room, or the ladies’ room at public spaces, from nightclubs to bars. The short video shows women touching up their make-up, socialising and generally letting their guard down, in a space where “strangers become allies, the compliments are free and the drama is left on the dancefloor”.


Topshop: The Anti-Cliché Christmas

Topshop appeals to its young and trendy demographic with a call to express individuality. The spot showcases models of all different styles, from modern sportswear to grungy, walking as cuts outs in front of backgrounds including cityscapes and the beachside, emphasising the idea of party dressing “without the one-size-fits-all approach” in order to represent an anti-cliché sort of Christmas.

To celebrate the sentiment, Topshop has also launched its still image campaign presenting its next generation of rising fashion stars, which are models Stella Maxwell, Londone Myers, Cami Morrone, Jing Wen, Kiki Willems, Marjan Jonkman, Damaris Goddrie, Caitie Green and Lottie Moss, Kate Moss’ youngest sister. Explaining the campaign, Kate Phelan, the retailer’s creative director, says: “This season is about the individual spirit of a woman – she no longer wants to be part of a tribe, she has her own style.”


House of Fraser: Christmas is Coming for You

British retailer House of Fraser is aiming to convey the excitement and anticipation that precedes the season with a modern dance spot, in the same vein as Farfetch. Teaming up with choreographer Suzette Brissett, the spot showcases dancers going through a whirlwind of settings, including an opulent dining table and a forest where trees are filled with presents. The upbeat soundtrack is courtesy of British songstress Laura Mvula, who reinterprets The Fugees’ classic Ready or Not track.


And more…

Additional ones to check out below include Cartier, Very.co.uk, Louis Vuitton, Dior, Harvey Nichols, Jack Wills, Boohoo.com, Debenhams, New Look, Tiffany & Co, Gap and Banana Republic. As a bonus: also tugging our heart strings outside the fashion space, is Sainsbury’s The Greatest Gift.

Additional reporting by Siena Hoggianto

Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups technology

What you missed: Snapchat’s spectacles, driving see-now buy-now sales, Cartier’s sponsored content

Snapchat spectacles
Snapchat spectacles

It might have been Milan Fashion Week, but the majority of musing worth knowing about in the digital space this past week surrounds the launch of Snapchat’s (now Snap Inc’s) new camera glasses. On top of that has been everything from whether see-now, buy-now fashion week shows are actually driving sales, the fact McQueen and Chanel top a new CoolBrands list, and why LVMH’s digital drive is taking time despite its big Apple hire. Read on for a breakdown of everything you need to know…


TOP STORIES
  • Why Snapchat’s spectacles can succeed where Google Glass failed [AdAge]
  • Are ‘see now, buy now’ shows driving sales? [BoF]
  • Neiman Marcus is encouraging brands to adopt ‘see-now, buy-now’ strategy [Fashionista]
  • Alexander McQueen and Chanel make top 20 global CoolBrands list [The Industry]
  • Inside Cartier’s sponsored content strategy [Glossy]

BUSINESS
  • LVMH’s digital drive takes time despite Apple hire [Reuters]
  • Adidas and Under Armour are challenging Nike like never before [Business Insider]
  • Tiffany proposes growth through engagement in the digital age [BrandChannel]

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • YSL Beauté reveals first ever UK Snapchat lens [The Industry]
  • Adidas claims retention on Snapchat is ‘insane’ compared to YouTube [The Drum]
  • Teens talk Instagram beauty influencers and what makes them buy [Racked]
  • Here’s how much engagement brands got from back-to-school social posts [AdWeek]
  • Google launches messaging app with chatbot [Campaign]
  • Branded emojis coming to messaging apps [WSJ]

MARKETING
  • Gap teams up with Mr Black to raise awareness for denim care [Fashion United]
  • Bobbi Brown initiates mobile makeovers with Uber [WWD]

RETAIL
  • How designer Rebecca Minkoff uses technology to create a better shopping experience [The Street]
  • BHS to launch online a month after last store closed [Guardian]
  • Zara fashions an expanded online growth strategy [BrandChannel]

TECHNOLOGY
  • The secret lab where Nike invented the power-lacing shoe of our dreams [Wired]
  • No. 21 Sends shoes that glow in the dark down the Milan Fashion Week runway [Footwear News]

START-UPS
  • Carmen Busquets, fashion e-commerce’s fairy godmother [NY Times]
  • Where is the Uber of fashion? [Forbes]
Categories
e-commerce

Which two leading luxury brands are messing up digitally?

luxury-board

This report may be telling us something we think we know already, but it should also make scary reading for many people working in luxury goods.

The fact is, too many high-end designer brands could do one helluva lot more when it comes to providing a luxury experience to customers who buy products online, according to new research from fashion and luxury brands specialist ContactLab.

Ok, that’s not exactly a revelation but after the recent L2 report that slammed the digital offer of some top luxury labels, it’s certainly an additional wake-up call.

ContactLab said luxury brands could actually be losing consumers who aren’t satisfied with their service. And it found that two of the worst offenders for not getting digital right included a fashion brand seen as the most innovative design-wise and a jeweller that really should know better (more of them later).

How they did it?

The Online Purchase Experience Ranking report, produced by ContactLab in conjunction with Exane BNP Paribas, certainly makes interesting reading.

The reseracher’s analysts developed 67 parameters to measure the service offered by luxury retailers from online ordering, to delivery, as well as packaging and returns.

It looked at 29 recognisable global luxury brands, including four major e-tailers, and it wasn’t impressed!

So what’s the story? It wasn’t about flashy digital features. Instead the team studied the consumer journey by purchasing two items from each brand, one for men and one for women, analysing each individual step. Those items were a men’s cardholder and a women’s belt, not hugely valuable compared to many other items on the luxury sites and so unlikely to trigger any extra special service.

The brands examined included Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Prada, Burberry, Hermès, Cartier, Tiffany, and Armani, among other leading luxury players.

cartier-website

Winners and losers

The top five brands by physical touchpoints such as delivery, packaging, documentation and returns were Fendi, Cartier, Louis Vuitton, and pureplay e-tailers Mytheresa and Mr Porter. Funnily enough, digital star Burberry was only 12th highest.

The top five by digital touch points such as abandoned carts, ordering, and purchasing and returns communications were Balenciaga, Net-a-Porter, Saint Laurent, Zegna and Armani. This time Burberry wasn’t even in the top half of the list.

So who came bottom? For physical touch points it was Givenchy, Prada, Valentino, Armani and Tiffany. Prompting the question how can Tiffany get it so wrong when jewellery peer Cartier gets it so right?

And for digital touch points it was Hermès, Ferragamo, Loro Piana, and once again, Tiffany and Prada.

So it looks like they’re the kids in the corner with the digital dunce’s cap on.

ContactLab CEO Massimo Fubini said: “There is definitely work to be done in the luxury sector. Consumers pay a lot of money for products from these luxury brands and they expect the whole experience to have that luxury feeling, from the moment they order the item to the moment it arrives at their door. Brands must go that bit further at every single stage of the consumer journey, but very few are fulfilling their full potential.

“Many brands are missing the little touches which make all the difference, such as covering the product in standard parcel paper rather than delivering it in a more luxurious manner. Some brands, such as Fendi, Cartier, Tod’s and Net-a-Porter do show best practice when it comes to packaging and focus on maintaining that feeling of luxury throughout the whole consumer journey.”

mr-porter

So what else did they discover?

  • LVMH has clearly made digital development a priority. Fendi’s number one position and Louis Vuitton’s honourable placing – as well as other factors – point to virtuous competition being unleashed within the group, which can only benefit performance.
  • In a similar vein, Richemont should benefit from Cartier’s know-how and from its relations with Yoox/Net-a-Porter (NAP).
  • Kering, by contrast, seems to be losing some of its lustre. Once the Gucci relaunch is on track, analysts will be expecting senior management to address its shortcomings in digital.
  • ContactLab expects pureplay “first mover advantage” to erode at some point. For instance, while Net-à-porter scores high on online shopping experience it’s below both Cartier and Fendi so it can’t take its position for granted as latecomers catch up.
  • Established luxury names increasing their digital footprint have an advantage compared to pureplay e-tailers. ContactLab said that if luxury brands embark on digital, the imperative for them is to be at least as good as the “industry standard” (ie Yoox/NaP). The economics are bound to be stronger for those luxury brands (and incumbent multibrand retailers) than for the pureplays. Customer acquisition costs will remain lower for luxury goods incumbents for a very long time, given their cumulated brand investments and relative scale.
  • The study found that the brands analysed are reaching less than half of their maximum potential on both physical touch points (46%) and digital touch points (45%).
  • It also found that e-tailers generally perform better than most monobrands, in particular Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter, which score well on both physical and digital touch points.
  • ContactLab also said that the “powered-by Yoox” brands whose e-stores are run by e-tail giant Yoox, generally perform well on digital.

So, while it’s not exactly a wipeout for the luxury sector, it’s clear that some labels charging high prices for their goods really need to get their acts together digitally – and fast.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
film

Animation features heavy in this year’s branded Christmas videos

There’s a lot in the way of cute animation happening this festive period, with noteworthy spots from Hermès, Dolce & Gabbana and Cartier, as well as that big budget number from John Lewis.

Check them each out below:

 

Bonus: This is not quite a Christmas spot, but there’s a fun animation worth a watch from Louis Vuitton too. It pays tribute to games like Tetris and Space Invaders to promote its new iPhone and iPad cases just in time for the holiday season…

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media

Digital snippets: Michael Kors, Banana Republic, Macy’s, Kate Spade, John Lewis, L’Oréal, Juicy Couture, Sephora

A short break here means there’s a stack of content to catch up on. Below are the top links for stories surrounding fashion and digital during my recent fortnight of travels. Hours of fun…

MichaelKors_Instagram

  • Michael Kors’ widely hated Instagram ad was actually a massive success; received almost four times as many likes as the average post [Business Insider
  • John Lewis 2013 Christmas ad beats 2012 ad total YouTube views within days of release [The Drum]
  • Banana Republic, CNNMoney and CNBC among top Twitter accounts during TWTR IPO [TechCrunch]
  • Like what you see? Kate Spade video ad designed for instant shopping [Mashable]
  • L’Oréal Paris launches make-up vending machines in NYC subway [Fashionista
  • Juicy Couture to be first brand to advertise using Snapchat Stories [The Drum]
  • At Sephora, mobile-first means ‘connecting’ the customer’s experiences [eMarketer]
  • Neiman Marcus teams up with Shapeways to offer 3D printed holiday capsule collection [PSFK] 
  • Printemps sets e-commerce strategy [WWD
  • Cartier North America CEO stresses importance of carefully curated digital presence [Luxury Daily]
  • How can retailers make it easier to buy jeans online? [Econsultancy]
  • On the same theme: This app can find your true bra size by taking two selfies of your breasts [Business Insider
  • Vanessa Traina launches new curated e-commerce venture The Line [BoF]
  • Fashion bloggers see a missed opportunity to monetise Instagram posts – why aren’t links allowed? [AdWeek
Categories
digital snippets social media

Digital snippets: Nordstrom, Apple, YSL, Instagram, Tesco, Forever 21, Cartier

Here’s a highlight of stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

Pinterest-nordstrom2

  • Nordstrom adds Pinterest logo to products in-store as social proof for potential buyers (as pictured) [Gigaom]
  • Apple poaches Yves Saint Laurent CEO to work on ‘special projects’ [Mashable]
  • Fashion shows increasingly come with perfectly staged Instagram moments [BoF]
  • Tesco aims to be first supermarket to introduce 3D printing in-store [PSFK]
  • Forever 21 pushes instant outfit inspiration with new social platform, 21st Street  [MTV Style]
  • Cartier releases seven short films for seven rings [Fashionotes]
  • Why Eva Chen is the first editor-in-chief of our generation [Fashionista]
  • 12 digital technologies retailers are investing in [Mashable]
  • “Sale” proves more powerful than “save” in subject lines of emails [Econsultancy]
Categories
film Uncategorized

A pick of the best fashion films for holiday 2012

In the fast-paced run up to Christmas madness, here’s a little Friday respite with a highlight of 10 of the best festive fashion, retail and luxury films:

1. Topshop: Winter Wonderland

 

2. Barneys: Electric Holiday

 

3. adidas: The Cautionary Tale of Ebenezer Snoop

 

4. Warehouse: Christmas SOS

 

5. Selfridges: Not Your Usual Christmas

 

6. Cartier: Winter Tale

 

7. Debenhams: Christmas Made Fabulous

 

8. Macy’s: Another Miracle on 34th Street

 

9. Gap: Love Comes in Every Shade

 

10. John Lewis: The Journey

 

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digital snippets Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Jean Paul Gaultier, Barneys, Neiman Marcus, Cartier

I’ve just arrived at SXSW in Austin, Texas, for a few days, where I’m very excited to see there looks set to be more fashion-related content than ever before. Stay tuned for coverage on that, and please excuse the hiatus otherwise throughout it.

In the meantime, here’s a look at a few more stories surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Jean Paul Gaultier releases first film of three-part mini series in new role as creative director of Diet Coke (as above) [Fashionista]
  • Barneys launches shoppable video for spring CO-OP campaign [The Window]
  • Neiman Marcus tests new customer service app [WWD]
  • Cartier embarks on multi-channel Odyssey campaign [L2 Think Tank]
  • Leading Pinterest user to ‘Live Pin’ for fashion label Calypso St. Barth [Mashable]
  • Online fashion outlet Nasty Gal raises $9m from Index Ventures [TechCrunch]