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Fruit of the Loom releases city-wide stunt for unnoticeable underwear

Fruit of the Loom

Fruit of the Loom has launched a campaign stunt that highlights how light its underwear is by testing how much passersby are paying attention to their surroundings in New York City.

In support of the brand’s new EverLight™ underwear, the brand has created physical installations around the city that blend into the urban setting, purposively designed to be unnoticeable.

Examples included a typical tourist telescope pointed at a brick wall and a small red door reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland that was located so closely to the ground few would notice it. Those who spot the initiative and take the time to stop and look can discover hidden clues leading them to a reward of cash prizes and free underwear.

Those clues include using very small writing to hide behind a large chunk of incoherent sentences, or a larger-than-life QR code that has to be scanned to reveal the location of the prize.

While the brand was not sure what to expect, it was right in its assumption of low noticeability. Of the nine million citizens of New York, only six savvy people have taken the time to engage with the advertising and interpret the clues. The six winners have each taken home $1,851 in cash, which, in another tongue-in-cheek move from the brand, corresponds to the year that it was founded, as well as free EverLight™ underwear.

While the campaign is ongoing, a video released by the brand chronicles not only the reactions of passersby, but tone that implies that the project is as much a social experiment as an advertising stunt.

With a total of 11 installations, and with only six that having been completed, the brand is now encouraging people in New York City to watch out for a poster of a realtor that looks a little bit off, a newspaper ad for a broken printer, and a little red man waving its arms.

This all follows a larger move from Fruit of the Loom for taking a humorous approach to promoting its brand at present. In May this year, it also released a satirical PSA against shiftless selfies, explaining that men were taking their tops off so often because they weren’t wearing the right t-shirts.

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Human rights foundation highlights modern slavery with unboxing video stunt

Unboxing the Truth - Thomson Reuters Foundation
Unboxing the Truth – Thomson Reuters Foundation

The Thomson Reuters Foundation (TRF), which works with journalists and organizations to bring to light human rights abuses and corruption, is tapping into the millennial behaviour of unboxing videos to highlight one of its causes.

To do so, the foundation teamed up with Jacques Slade, a YouTube personality known for videos where he unboxes sneakers to a 851,000-strong audience, to highlight the plight of modern slavery.

Slade’s video begins with a disclaimer explaning that he was sent a mystery box and viewers should stick around to learn a really important message. He then proceeds to open the package, to reveal a high-end shoe box where the word “Humanmade” is replaced by “Slavemade” once it is fully opened. As the pair of shoes is revealed so are stats about modern slavery, which can be found on the shoe’s tongue, laces and soles.

Stats disclose that slavery still exists in 161 countries and counting, while also highlighting that less than 2% of slaves will ever be rescued. Slade then shows the shoe’s dust bag, in which a printed letter addressed to him and his viewers explains that they do not expect people to stop buying sneakers, but rather to stop and ask themselves: “What is the human price of the products you buy?”

Slade, whose core audience is men aged 13-24, explains that he was initially contacted by a creative agency on behalf of an “unspecified nonprofit organization” to take part in a video about forced labour, and that was the extent of what he knew prior to recording the video.

The stunt aimed to tap into an audience who is highly engaged about their passion, which in this case is owning and cherishing limited-edition footwear by the likes of Nike and adidas.

As part of the campaign, the organization is asking for donations towards its fight against slavery and human trafficking. Donations will go towards funding media coverage, training and mentoring journalists in specific geographies with a high prevalence of slavery, and bringing frontline activists to the Trust Conference where they would learn new skills.

Unboxing the Truth - Thomson Reuters Foundation
Unboxing the Truth – Thomson Reuters Foundation
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Campaigns Editor's pick Retail

Diesel pop-up sells limited edition “fakes” as part of SS18 campaign

Deisel pop up from Diesel
The “Deisel” pop-up from Diesel

Diesel is looking to reinforce its authentic roots with a “fake” pop-up store during New York Fashion Week. As part of its latest campaign celebrating imperfection, the brand opened “Deisel” in NYC’s Chinatown – a neighbourhood known for touting knockoffs – selling seemingly fake goods.

The stunt was eventually revealed on social media, as Diesel shared a video depicting footage of the store. Inside, the pop-up space was set up to look improvised and blend in with its Canal Street neighbors, while shop assistants tried to convince confused passersby that the goods were real.

Once the secret was out, Diesel fans began to form long queues outside the store, trying to get their hands on the limited edition goods, which were also available for purchase in Europe online.

Speaking to reporters, Renzo Rosso, founder of Diesel and president of its parent company OTB Group, said the aim of the campaign is to play on the irony and sense of humor he believes the brand has always relied on, which has been lost over the past few years.

“Diesel is back,” he said. ”Diesel is modern. Diesel is a unique brand. Diesel is still alive with the real irony and with the real DNA that it used to have before.”

Andy Bird, chief creative officer at Diesel’s recently appointed agency Publicis, told Adweek: “I think a brand like Diesel has the balls and the right to talk like this. There aren’t many brands that would take a calculated risk like this, but because they kind of know that they already have the cachet with the past history of advertising, they’ve always been a bit more adventurous and it fits perfectly with their outlook.”

Moving forward, the brand believes social media and campaign stunts are becoming a major focus for engagement. According to Rosso, the next soon-to-be-released stunt will see an individual jump from atop St Marcus tower in Venice, Italy.

In our recent episode of TheCurrent Innovators podcast, Stefano Rosso, Diesel’s CEO of North America, talked in-depth about the brand’s approach to challenging conformity.