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Campaigns Editor's pick Retail sustainability

Timberland debuts 13-foot installation in NY to accompany green pledge

Timberland
Timberland

 

Timberland is celebrating its 45-year anniversary with a pop-up park and 13-foot replica of its iconic Premium 6-Inch Wheat Boot in New York City.

Displayed in Flatiron District for one day only (Tuesday, October 16), the park and the boot installation represent the intersection of the brand’s New England roots and today’s modern city lifestyle.

The pop-up park has grass, benches, and living birch trees where visitors are encouraged to write and post their own eco-pledges. They are also invited to build their own potted succulent plant, a gift to green their personal space in the office or at home.

The park’s opening is otherwise the kick-off to a week-long series of events. On Wednesday, elements of the pop-up will then find a home at the Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics in East Harlem. More than 150 volunteers from Timberland, Journeys and the Student Conservation Association are coming together to restore a rooftop greenhouse, install a living roof and construct an outdoor classroom and gathering space.

This is part of Timberland’s pledge to create or restore 500K square feet of green space in US cities over the next five years. To increase the visibility of those actions, Timberland partnered with YouTube phenom Mahogany Lox, this season’s brand ambassador.

Timberland
Timberland

“At Timberland, we are guided by a greater purpose — to step outside, work together and make it better. Urban greening is a powerful way to bring this notion to life,” said Jim Pisani, global brand president at Timberland. “Green spaces are the heartbeat of a community. They not only provide a place to play and explore, they also help enhance quality of life. Simply put, they make neighborhoods stronger. We are proud to make this commitment today, so these vibrant city spaces can be enjoyed for generations to come.”

The end of the celebration takes place at the brand’s newly launched pop-up store, located at 511 Fifth Avenue until January 2019. The concept space embraces nature and experiences with shopgoers surrounded by 2,000 native New England plant species and able to see Instagram-friendly spaces called “Rain Room,” and ”Snow Room”.

All day on Friday, October 19, the public will have access to entertainment, giveaways, and boots raffled off every hour beginning at 12:30pm in the store.

Further urban greening events are taking place in Chicago and Los Angeles during the week.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. TheCurrent is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
data film

Which UK Christmas ad really grabbed us? You might be surprised

Marksandspencer

Christmas ads used to be all about selling product. Brands and retailers would dust off the Rat Pack Christmas album, add in some sparkly frocks and set the scene at a dinner party, office party or some other kind of party and there it was. Today though, those Christmas ads are spectaculars that have to build brand awareness, do some social/environmental good and set social media buzzing.

And they have to be emotionally engaging. So I was particularly interested in ICM Unlimited’s webcam survey that tracked consumer reaction to the ads from the UK’s big high street retailers.

They used webcams as part of a survey to capture emotions on faces during a screening of six festive ads. ICM Unlimited found that The Art of Christmas from M&S came top, just beating Sainsbury’s Mog ad as the most emotionally engaging ad. M&S was higher up the emotional engagement scale than any of the other ads tested using ‘facial coding’ and also beat Tesco, John Lewis, Asda and Boots.

ICM Unlimited and CrowdEmotion rated six ads based on a score for happiness, surprise, puzzlement, disgust, fear and sadness. Emotional engagement for the ads was compared against explicit appreciation – did audiences say that they enjoyed the ad? Based on the results, retailers fell into in one of four categories: Love It, Hate It, Needs Work or Guilty Pleasures.

Tom Wormald, director at ICM Unlimited, said: “In surveys, people claim they don’t respond to – or are not influenced by – TV advertising. But using a webcam we can prove we go on an emotional rollercoaster when watching commercials, meaning the ads are influencing our attitudes and behaviours in ways we often don’t even realise.

“The M&S ad sat firmly in our ‘Guilty Pleasures’ category because although people claimed not to like it, the emotional response shows that it brings a lot of ‘happiness’. Sainsbury’s triggered a positive ‘puzzlement’ response driven by curiosity about the storyline. A fast-paced but disjointed narrative from Boots registered a sense of ‘fear’ – it made people feel uncertain. We even detected a sense of ‘disgust’ in responses to some ads, possibly because viewers might feel manipulated by some parts of an advert.”

This is what ICM said about each one:

M&S – The Art of Christmas: Winner in ‘emotional engagement’ – happiness everywhere

This came up top as the most emotionally engaging advert, filled with extravagant visuals and using Mark Ronson’s Uptown Funk as the soundtrack. Upbeat and colourful, peppered with images of gift giving, feasting and excitement, this ad closes nostalgically with fleeting images of Morecambe & Wise. The ad really takes off with shots of children waking then jumping excitedly on beds. Here the facial expressions were all about happiness – 133% higher than the norm of the ads tested.

Sainsbury’s – Mog’s Christmas Calamity: Curiosity and the cat make this a favourite

High explicit appreciation and emotional engagement contributed to the success of this ad. Viewers experienced ‘fear’ at the start because when people see cute animals their protective instincts kick in – and that translates into fear of danger. But the ad’s humour quickly produces high scores for ‘happiness’, some 85% above the ad norm when Mog is spun around on a ceiling fan in the kitchen. The Sainsbury’s story created a strong sense of ‘puzzlement’ and curiosity too – scoring 150% higher for these emotions than the John Lewis ad.

Tesco finest Range – Flirt: Puzzlement and disgust

The sight of an awkward young man trying to impress a confident older woman with his tastes in desserts, cheese and wine also brought mixed emotions. There was ‘puzzlement’ about whether the flirty son would be put in his place. The young man’s insistence on seeking the older woman’s attention created a sense of ‘disgust’. But ‘happiness’ peaks when the young man’s mother arrives to put him down by showing her son some boys-sized pyjamas.

John Lewis – Man on The Moon: Experience the full range of emotions

This is the ad everyone wanted to hate (low explicit appreciation scores), but secretly loved (sound emotional engagement scores). Featuring a young girl making contact with the Man on the Moon, the ad is unusual and resulted in higher ‘surprise’ scores (40% more than Sainsbury’s Mog the Cat). It also registered ‘disgust’, with viewers possibly rejecting the ad for its use of feelings of guilt and pathos towards the elderly. Man on the Moon also scored 22% more ‘sadness’ compared to Mog the Cat.

Asda – Because it’s Christmas: Cute Pug dog with antlers hits the high point

Asda’s ad performed poorly on ‘explicit appreciation’ and ‘emotional engagement’. Despite the upbeat soundtrack and visuals, viewers felt the ad lacked a clear narrative. But there were some high points with ‘happiness’ surging to 60% above the norm when the cute Pug dog with antlers appears.

Boots – Discover More: Peaks of fear and disgust sprinkled with some happiness

Viewers saw the Boots ad as lacking a narrative. There were small peaks of ‘fear’, possibly due to a sense of disorientation as the ad moved quickly from scene to scene. Viewers also registered spikes of ‘disgust’, probably due to the heavy emphasis on product placement and limited human interaction, which can leave audiences feeling manipulated. Near the end there are small peaks of ‘happiness’ as a woman finally makes eye contact and waves to viewers.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

Categories
social media

Hunter uses Instagram video as second screen to #LFW show

HUNTER_LFW_Instagram

Hunter might be the new kid on the block this London Fashion Week season, but its show and accompanying social media coverage was as slick as the best of them.

The famous wellington boot brand introduced its new Hunter Original line with models parading along a catwalk covered in water. Under the creative direction of Stella McCartney’s husband Alasdhair Willis, this was a stylish line of practical outerwear, not to mention numerous new footwear pieces, fit for the current UK weather.

But for those watching online, it was the Instagram video posts that particularly stood out. In a sea of thousands of #LFW tagged images, not to mention endless blurry runway Insta-videos, Hunter took to the platform with a series of high quality, pre-produced clips.

Created as part of the wider #beahunteroriginal social media campaign, each one was designed to “capture the inspiration behind the collection and allow a deeper insight into what is being seen on the runway”. What that actually meant was quite abstract, creative work.

Overlaid copy set the theme – “If you’re born a pioneer”, “Forged by the desire to discover” or  “Take the path that others dare not take”, from one to the next. Graphics spliced in then showed a section of a boot, a close-up on a fabric or an original sketch, as well as a series of autumnal outdoor scenes nodding to the heritage of the brand.

Willis said: “Born out of a passion to innovate, a pioneering spirit has always been at the heart of the brand. This spirit is key as the future vision for Hunter is developed and the reason for leveraging Instagram in this way. We are delivering a unique experience for the Instagram community, in real time, providing a deeper insight into the story of the collection and the world of Hunter Original.”

Hunter referred to the Instagram move as its LFW “second screen experience”. See each of the posts below…