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Campaigns technology

Emporio Armani creates life-like 3D printed ad

A new outdoor advertising campaign from Emporio Armani has turned to 3D printing to make its designs come to life.

The ad features a 3D version of the model’s right leg extending out of the billboard, making it seem as though she is stepping into the real world.

The effect was created by an Italian 3D printing and industrial photography company called Colorzenith, which printed the foot and a partial leg to then attach it to the billboard.

The company explains that for the project it used a Gel Dispensing Printing (GDP) technology, which differs from the more mainstream application of other polymer-based 3D printing processes.

Out of home advertising is getting a new lease of life in a digital-first world, with other brands increasingly using the medium in innovative ways.

For example last year Adidas Originals launched a campaign to promote the launch of its P.O.D. shoe, for which it set up a series of personalized outdoor ads in Los Angeles and New York, which each spoke individually to a group of influencers.

While this is new territory for Emporio Armani, the label has been expanding its focus on lifestyle and hospitality, having very recently re-launched its Empori Caffè and Ristorante in Milan, which now sits in the same building as the Armani Hotel and the Emporio Armani megastore.

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about helping you build innovative integrations and experiences. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology, powered by a network of top startups. Get in touch to learn more.

Categories
product sustainability

Ocean Outdoor creates accessories out of recycled billboards for London Fashion Week

UK outdoor media owner Ocean Outdoor is teaming up with eco-label VIN + OMI to launch an exclusive collection during London Fashion Week that will be manufactured entirely from vinyl panels taken from billboard displays.

The partnership will feature men’s and women’s accessories and not be available for sale. Instead, Ocean will donate the pieces to its charity partner, the Marine Conservation Society, to help fund the fight against plastic pollution in order to protect the world’s oceans and marine line. This is in one with Ocean’s commitment to staying at the forefront of innovation, as the majority of its out-of-home advertising is already purely digital.

“As a 95 percent based digital media company, Ocean is actively moving away from the use of vinyl,” said Liliana Teixeira, Ocean’s senior marketing executive. “That said, it’s important we find the best possible way to upcycle the vinyl we do still use. This partnership also allows us to support emerging creative talent which adds to its scale and impact,”

UK-born VIN + OMI works in developing recycled polyester (rPET) textiles, including silk-like finishes and wool which are spun from salvaged plastic primarily sourced from rivers and oceans. For this project, it will be working with students from Oxford Brookes University who will help design the collection. This means that in addition teaching a new generation how to work with sustainable garments, the project will further bring together a community with the common goal of raising awareness to the cause.

The range will feature at VIN + OMI’s London Fashion Week show on February 14, while Ocean will display highlights of the presentation on February 18 across its The Grid digital displays country-wide as well as on the iconic Piccadilly Lights display in Piccadilly Circus, London. Last fashion week season, Ocean teamed up with designer Victoria Beckham to livestream her show on the same screens, marking the first time the company streamed live content on its 4K displays.

Are you thinking innovatively enough about sustainability? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more.

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digital snippets mobile social media Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Louis Vuitton, Project Runway, Westfield, Nike, Macy’s, Ikea

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Louis Vuitton’s Yayoi Kusama app turns pics into polka dot art prints (as above) [PSFK]
  • Virtual Heidi Klum rates outfits of visitors to New York’s High Line via interactive Project Runway billboard [AdWeek]
  • Westfield pits East against West in social media Olympics campaign [Campaign]
  • Nike to run real-time Olympics Twitter ads [The Drum]
  • Macy’s rolls out Shopkick mobile rewards app nationwide [AllThingsD]
  • Retail brands can benefit from greater reach on Facebook by targeting their fans’ friends [Media Week]
  • B2B fashion sites on the rise [WWD]
  • Spoonflower lets users design and sell own custom fabric [TechCrunch]
Categories
technology Uncategorized

Digital billboards in Times Square, New York

American Eagle and Forever 21’s digital billboards in New York might have been written about numerous times before, but seeing them firsthand is quite another experience, so I couldn’t help but get my camera out.

Forever 21's interactive billboard at Times Square

Forever 21’s is the epitome of interactive. Using high-tech surveillance equipment and computer vision technology, it plays on the notion of vanity (who doesn’t like to see themselves on a 61-foot screen) to form a real-time image of the crowd.

A super-sized virtual model can be seen taking a Polaroid photo of onlookers before showing it to them once developed; picking up an individual and either turning him into a frog by a kiss or dropping him into a shopping bag; or placing a magnifying glass over certain groups.

The campaign, created by interactive agency Space150, even picks up on the yellow of the Forever 21 bag, to specifically pick out those that have shopped in the store. Bearing in mind consumers look at billboards for an average of six seconds normally, this one definitely has people captured for a couple of minutes at a time – and that’s a whole year after it first launched.

Check out the video, below:

Meanwhile, American Eagle’s similarly taps into the “15 seconds of fame” idea. It’s been about for a little while longer (first trialled in November 2009), but continues to fare well. Anyone who buys something in store can opt to have both their photo and a message posted to the multiple giant screens, some 25-storeys high, outside.

It all happens within 15 minutes so there’s not too much hanging around in the meantime, but while you wait, there’s also conveniently a rotation of all the current campaign shots too.

Check out the below slideshow of examples:

And a couple of other related things I loved…

The fashion ads from Pepsi for its new skinny can, also in Times Square:

Clinique’s digital vending machines at JFK airport:

Categories
Uncategorized

Y-3’s time-lapse billboard painting

Y-3 by Yohji Yamamoto has released a time-lapse video documenting the painting of one of its spring/summer 2011 images on a billboard in New York.

The campaign from the designer adidas brand was painted on a 48 x 38 ft space on the corner of Houston Street and Broadway over several days by Colossal Media Group.

The video, directed by Aaron Wesner, shows the activity compressed into just one minute.

The original spring/summer 2011 image features model Jacob Coupe, it was shot by Jacob Sutton and styled by Jay Massacret.

Categories
Uncategorized

Polyvore winners to feature on American Eagle billboard

A winning collage by lauren.y.b

The four winners of user-generated style site Polyvore’s Spring Break Style Contest are set to have their winning collages featured on the American Eagle billboard in Times Square, New York, from March 11-18.

Over 13,000 entires were submitted to the competition, a record for Polyvore. Each had to feature American Eagle merchandise.

A total of 40,000 “likes,” 3,000 comments and half a million impressions, followed.

Winners were Lauren.y.b, Kristelle Yokley, StelleM and nperu.

[Mashable]