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digital snippets e-commerce Retail sustainability technology

ICYMI: 5G to drive AR shopping, luxury loves blockchain, cotton totes vs plastic bags

A round-up of everything you might have missed in relevant fashion, retail and tech industry news over the past week.

TOP STORIES
  • 5G will drive 100m people to shop in AR by next year [Mobile Marketer]
  • How luxury fashion learned to love the blockchain [BoF]
  • Your cotton tote is pretty much the worst replacement for a plastic bag [Quartz]
  • Beyonce to design shoes and clothes for Adidas [Bloomberg]
TECHNOLOGY
  • Facial recognition is coming to hotels to make check-in easier—and much creepier [Fast Company]
  • Is digital clothing the next fashion frontier? [Vogue Business]
  • Facebook gets one step closer to building your virtual copy [Tech Crunch]
  • NBA lets Magic Leap users watch live AR basketball [Mobile Marketer]
SUSTAINABILITY & PURPOSE
  • NY to ban single-use plastic bags by 2020 [Fashion United]
  • Patagonia is cracking down on the Wall Street uniform [Bloomberg]
  • Does the ethical fashion community have a diversity problem? [Fashionista]
  • Bangladeshi government ‘not ready’ to take over safety regulation [Drapers]
  • Just how eco-friendly are lab-created diamonds? [JCK Online]
  • Printemps puts spotlight on upcycling initiatives [WWD]
  • Indian University works to grow cotton in red, blue, yellow hues [Sourcing Journal]
RETAIL & E-COMMERCE
  • Online shopping overtakes a major part of retail for the first time ever [CNBC]
  • Hermès opens a new kind of shop in New York [Bloomberg]
  • Asos updates returns policy to prevent ‘serial returners’ [Drapers]
MARKETING & SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Marketers say Instagram is the best way to reach teens [Digiday]
  • Snapchat will power Stories & ads in other apps [Tech Crunch]
  • YSL’s gas station pop-up is taking over Coachella [Highsnobiety]
  • Reebok launches loyalty program unlocked as part of digital overhaul [Footwear News]
PRODUCT
  • Under Armour launches new tech-enhanced performance line ‘Rush’ [Fashion Network]
  • Lululemon set to debut selfcare product line [Retail Dive]
  • American Apparel relaunches denim with inclusive sizing [Fashion United]
BUSINESS
  • Britain’s loss is Europe’s gain as brands go offshore ahead of Brexit [WWD]
  • Kering completes luxury transition with Volcom sale [WWD]
  • Supreme breaks silence on ‘criminal’ global counterfeiting menace [BoF]
CULTURE
  • Fashion’s gender pay gap isn’t getting any smaller [BoF]
  • Anxiety is rising. So are wellness companies promising relief [Vogue Business]
  • Net-A-Porter launches biggest ever Ramadan initiative [Fashion Network]
  • Model with Down’s Syndrome becomes brand ambassador for Benefit cosmetics [Herald Sun]
  • Men are changing. Are brands keeping up? [BoF]

How are you thinking about innovation? We’re all about finding you the perfect partners to do so. The Current Global is a consultancy transforming how fashion, beauty and consumer retail brands intersect with technology. We deliver innovative integrations and experiences, powered by a network of top technologies and startups. Get in touch to learn more. 

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Comment Editor's pick

Comment counts: Human insights should drive both fashion trends and brand communications

Understanding changing human behaviour is the surest way to create a trend in fashion today, but such attitudes need to be reflected in our communications and not just products, argues Frances Docx of 18 Feet & Rising.

beyonce-ivy-park
Ivy Park

In the past, the fashion trend trajectory was simple: from fashion houses to magazines, consumers copying celebrities. Everyone knew their rightful place in the fashion food chain, and the clothes would remain on the high street until those in power decided a new season was ready to launch.

Cut to the internet and this online world has hastened and devolved the traditional fashion process entirely. Now trends can emerge from anywhere at any time – the high street, teens on Instagram… a Wikihow page with a seven-step illustrated guide to starting your own.

In a world of microwave-minute attention spans and a ‘buy now’ impulse control disorder, fashion brands have to look beyond short-lived trend sources towards something that endures and evolves as their brand does.

So where should they turn for inspiration to create fresh and enduring work? Where we’ve always looked: to people. The surest way to predict a trend is to create one. And the most effective way to create a trend is to study and predict human behaviour and attitudes.

A topline example: UK gym membership spending is up by 44%. What’s the consequence for fashion? You can’t move for box-fresh Adidas Stan Smiths, endless versions of the ‘athleisure’ trend and the likes of Beyoncé’s newly launched fitness line, Ivy Park, crashing the Topshop website.

Looking good has become so synonymous with physical fitness that by a series of cognitive leaps everyone is wearing tennis shoes – with no intention of playing tennis. And we don’t care either, by the way. We only care if the white on our kicks stays bright.

And what else? We only wear 20% of our wardrobe on a regular basis and we throw away over one million tonnes of clothing and other textiles in the UK each year. It’s not because we don’t like the rejected 80%; generally we do, but maybe the fit isn’t quite right, the neckline is a bit low and we’d rather wear one of our old favourites.

Meanwhile, instead of the buy-it-cheap-pile-it-high Primark mentality, we also see disrupters such as Tom Cridland entering the mass market with his 30-year sweatshirt. Or designers such as Vivienne Westwood that encourage shoppers to choose well so they only choose once.

Everyday people are changing the face of retail. Brands must realise, respect and pay attention to this. And the impact must be reflected not only in the product on their shelves but in the way they communicate to consumers.

Insights (the behaviour and perceptual mapping of trends) have long been the bread and butter of brand communications. But up until now they have retreated behind the “Advertising Idea” like a hungover mollusk.

Communications today are firmly driven by the “we understand you” mantra; capitalising on emotionally charged purchasing. We see this in the UK with personalised discounting like the MyWaitrose scheme, through to the advent of Memevertising such as with House of Fraser’s “My Face When…” 2015 campaign (as above, by 18 Feet & Rising).

To those in fashion scratching their heads over the latest trend reports working out how to make SS17 and beyond fresh – put down that colour palette, stop looking at what your fashion forefathers have done and consider applying these rules of thumb:

  • Be more human
  • Listen more
  • Watch more
  • Copy

Don’t predict fashion trends, predict behaviour change.

Frances Docx is a planner at creative agency 18 Feet & Rising. Comment Counts is a series of opinion pieces from experts within the industry. Do you have something to say? Get in touch via info@fashionandmash.com.

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce mobile social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Inside the Vogue x Apple relationship, Gucci’s digital strategy, Farfetch raises $110m

Gucci

It probably goes without saying you’re well and truly over the plethora of stories covering the cyber-themed Met Gala looks (including the true wearable tech pieces), but if you haven’t read Racked’s piece on the relationship between Vogue and Apple in the build-up to the event – as below – then do take the time. Also buzzing in fashion and tech news over the past couple of weeks is everything from further advertising plans on Snapchat to Gucci’s digital strategy and the wearable revolution taking place in Brooklyn. Read on for a complete rundown…


  • Unravelling Vogue and Apple’s self-serving relationship [Racked]

  • The digital strategy driving Gucci’s growth (as pictured) [Glossy]

  • Farfetch raises $110 million in ‘strategic’ move [BoF]

  • William Gibson and Andrew Bolton on the future of fashion and technology [Document Journal]

  • Decoding ‘Manus x Machina’ [BoF]

  • Westfield launches room service retail with interactive mirror [Retail Gazette]

  • Target and Lancôme produce Snapchat’s first e-commerce ads [AdWeek]

  • Old Navy ad with interracial couple sparks a social media firestorm [BrandChannel]

  • Louis Vuitton and Snapchat team up to bring live coverage of world class sailing event [The Drum]

  • Lyst inspires post-work shopping therapy with subway placements [Luxury Daily]

  • If you don’t get social media-only brand ‘Obsessee,’ you probably aren’t its target audience [Fashionista]

  • Bushy eyebrows and $50k per day on Facebook ads: How a small beauty brand blew up [Forbes]

  • How Snapchat won the Met Gala [WGSN Insider]

  • 10 of the best brands on Snapchat right now (and why they’re so great) [Hubspot]

  • How to build a brand on Instagram [Fashionista]

  • Brooklyn’s wearable revolution [NY Times]

  • Why Silicon Valley VC firms fund online retailers like Dollar Shave Club [Seattle Times]

  • Is Flipkart turning into the perfect example of what a tech startup must not do? [Quartz]

  • The future of shopping: trapping you in a club you didn’t know you joined [Bloomberg]

  • The future of the fashion show, according to MatchesFashion.com’s Ruth and Tom Chapman [Vogue]

  • This new tool wants to make the off-price clothing business easier [Fast Company]

  • Digiday launches new fashion and luxury publication, Glossy [Digiday]

  • Heated coats and Kate Moss holograms: the key moments fashion and technology have collided [Daily Telegraph]

  • This video of Anna Wintour introducing the @Voguemagazine app is oddly threatening [Fashionista]

  • The sneakerhead bot problem is getting worse and Nike has the only answer (so far) [HighSnobiety]

  • What fashion brands can learn from Beyoncé’s Lemonade [BoF]
Categories
social media

Instagram likes: Kendall Jenner, Taylor Swift take 2015 prize

instagram-board

It’s a very shallow world and it’s also one that’s celebrity-obsessed. That’s pretty obvious from the list of Instagram posts that got the most likes this year.

Was it a triumph of inspirational imagery? Not exactly. The unstoppable Kendall Jenner and Taylor Swift were the influencers who rocked this most visual of social media channels.

Kendall’s sister Kylie also got in on the act and last year’s most liked Instagrammer, Beyoncé, was still there (but at number five this year). Taylor Swift had the most entries in the top 10, however – six of them in fact.

Come on own up, are you responsible for one of the combined 12.9m likes these five posts received?

1-kendall-jenner

2-taylor-swift

3-taylor-swift

4-kylie-jenner

5-beyonce

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday