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digital snippets e-commerce social media technology

Digital snippets: Karl Lagerfeld’s Tumblr approach, previewing #ManusxMachina, Nike’s CDO

Karl


Your round-up of the latest stories to know about related to fashion and technology…

  • ‘World of Karl’ takes a Tumblr approach to Karl Lagerfeld’s brand [Digiday]
  • A sneak peek at the Costume Institute’s upcoming ‘Manus x Machina’ exhibit [Fashionista]
  • Why Nike has finally hired a chief digital officer [The Drum]
  • Tech is front and centre in new Neiman Marcus store [Fortune]
  • How New Look is getting its senior execs on board with artificial intelligence and virtual reality [The Drum]
  • How Fitbit’s collaboration with Public School aims to cement its place in the fashion world [Forbes]
  • John Lewis reveals how it will collapse the ‘black hole’ of customer data in its stores [The Drum]
  • Misha Nonoo marks consumer-driven fashion week move with shoppable Instagram campaign [Forbes]
  • Bergdorf Goodman gets in on instant fashion gratification act [Trendwalk]
  • Menswear brand John Varvatos boosted a new digital strategy with shoppable video [Digiday]
  • John Lewis reveals how it will collapse the ‘black hole’ of customer data in its stores [The Drum]
  • Apple and fashion: a love story for the digital ages [Vogue]
  • Beware the digital iceberg: reality goes far deeper than online sales [BoF]
  • Marketers should be hunting for a perfect product, not influencers [The Guardian]
  • The future of online retail is collaboration [Wired]
  • Are fashion’s changes putting young designers at risk? [Dazed]
  • Fashion industry scrambles to find a use for Snapchat [NY Times]
  • My little sister taught me how to “Snapchat like the teens” [Buzzfeed]
  • Wearable tech at NYFW: Emoji pins, Fitbit bands and GIF dresses [Wareable]
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digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups technology

Digital snippets: Wren, Gucci, John Lewis, Lord & Taylor, Kenneth Cole, Sephora

A bit of a catch-up post today in light of several weeks of travel… here then all the latest stories to know about surrounding fashion and tech from the past fortnight or so:

 

  • “First Kiss” film (as above) goes viral with 63 million views – is ad for clothing label Wren [NY Times]
  • Gucci launches own Spotify music hub to promote short film ‘The Fringe’ [The Drum]
  • John Lewis looks to digital innovation as next big thing in retail with ‘JLab incubator’ [The Guardian]
  • Lord & Taylor now accepting bitcoin [CNBC]
  • Kenneth Cole challenges consumers to do good deeds and prove it via Google Glass [Creativity]
  • Sephora launches ‘Beauty Board’ social shopping platform [USA Today]
  • Bergdorf Goodman makes Instagram shots shoppable at SXSW with 52Grams [5th/58th]
  • Dolce & Gabbana crafts love story around perfume to appeal to consumer emotion [Luxury Daily
  • adidas launches gaming platform powered by social media starring Lionel Messi [Marketing Magazine]
  • Can Instagram save ageing teen retailer Aeropostale? [CNBC]
  • Which big brands are courting the maker movement, and why – from Levi’s to Home Depot  [AdWeek]
  • How beacon technology could change the way we shop [Fashionista]
  • On Instagram, a bazaar where you least expect it [Bits blog]
  • What Google’s wearable tech platform could mean for the fashion industry [Fashionista]
  • Smartphone payment system to be unveiled in UK [FT]
  • Alibaba ramping up efforts to sell US brands in China [WSJ]
  • What does WeChat’s new e-credit card mean for luxury? [JingDaily]
  • Op-Ed | Are camera phones killing fashion? [BoF]
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film social media

How fashion brands are using Vine

This article first appeared on Mashable

Fashionbrands_Vine

The fashion industry immediately embraced Vine, Twitter’s 6-second video app, after it launched in February. It was no surprise it was suddenly so popular: The app was released just two weeks before New York Fashion Week kicked off, a time when behind-the-scenes runway shots were readily available to capture and share in 6-second loops.

But Vine is much more difficult to make look beautiful and polished than Instagram photos, and brands quickly discovered that to participate, they needed to relax their typically stringent production quality requirements. Perhaps that’s why, following the shows, most fashion houses dropped the platform altogether, only returning to it, in some cases, for the menswear shows in London and Milan earlier this month.

That’s not to say that Vine’s fashion future is dead — it’s merely getting a slow start. Early data indicates that Vine videos are shared four times as often as other kinds of Internet video, and the launch of video for Instagram, which many brands have already enthusiastically adopted, is creating further incentive for fashion firms to ramp up their capabilities and resources in this area.

Let’s take a look at a few fashion brands using Vine to exceptional effect…

Stop motion art

Stop-motion artists are among Vine’s most popular users. Eyeing this trend, French Connection collaborated with photographer Meagan Cignoli to create a series of highly shareable, summer-themed stop-motion videos. In one video, the brand’s latest collection packs itself into a suitcase for a holiday. In another, various outfits are laid out and rolled up on the beach.

Cignoli tells me that each video typically has between 100 and 120 separately recorded clips. The result is incredibly fluid and eye-catching, instantly negating any notion that Vine can’t be a platform for quality creative work. Online retailer Nasty Gal is another standout for stop-motion inspiration, weaving playful, wiggling pieces of candy in and around products like handbags, shoes and makeup. Burberry, too, has used stop-motion video to showcase product prints and patterns, as well as celebrities present at its last menswear show.

Showcasing product details

The beauty of the French Connection work by Cignoli is that it places products front and center, but it’s so creative it doesn’t feel like marketing. Marc Jacobs is another example of a designer who is doing this, releasing some nice stop-motion work that features handbags on what looks like a rotating conveyor belt.

For others, Vine presents an opportunity to demonstrate the work that goes into making products. Matthew Williamson did this during London Fashion Week in February with his #matthewmagnified campaign, and Oscar de la Renta, through the handle OscarPRGirl, used Vine to detail the craftsmanship that goes into its bridalwear pieces.

Gap is also using Vine to highlight key pieces in-store, but takes a more editorial approach, employing models for its videos. In one, a woman spins around in an assortment of dresses. In another, a young girl plays in the latest DVF GapKids collection in the park. These are much more developed than the clips that debuted during fashion week season: a haphazard amalgamation of garments on hangers and poorly lit models on runways.

Injecting personality

Some brands’ Vine videos manage to be both beautifully produced and full of personality.

Urban Outfitters released short videos that are playful yet stylish at the same time. In one clip, a bunch of balloons float into an office. In another, the contents of a purse are being prepared ahead of a festival trip. In another stop-motion video, makeup carries itself into a bag. It’s worth noting that with more than 40,000 followers, Urban Outfitters is one of the most popular brands on Vine, proving that volume and frequency of posts can be a more successful formula than fewer, higher quality videos — as showcased by French Connection, which has just a fraction of Urban Outfitters’ followers.

Behind the scenes

As mentioned, fashion brands released a great deal of behind-the-scenes content on Vine during fashion week season. This is a trend that’s continued since the shows, with brands and retailers providing windows into their corporate headquarters, design studios and individual stores.

Marc Jacobs has used Vine to take followers on many journeys at its headquarters and stores, from the creation of its latest Resort collection campaign to celebrity interviews during in-store book signings. Using the hashtag #staffstyles, Marc Jacobs frequently showcases the prints and patterns worn by its employees. In another example, Bergdorf Goodman features staffers as they try on different pairs of sunglasses. The video is tied to a message about sun protection.

Puma recently released a series of Vine videos featuring Olympic champion Usain Bolt on the set of his latest campaign for the brand. The quick all-access videos, shot again by Cignoli, frequently allow Bolt’s own personality to come through. Meanwhile, Nordstrom has shown what it’s like at its stores after hours, with shoes whimsically moving about on shelves when customers aren’t there. In another video, a flying shirt leads followers on a magical tour through merchandise.

Beyond the obvious

One thing fashion and retail brands haven’t taken advantage of is the how-to video, which is a popular hashtag on Vine. Bergdorfs has done a beauty tutorial and Nordstrom has used Vine to show how to tie a tie, but there are plenty more opportunities here.

As autumn’s busy event calendar gets rolling and the fall collections hit stores, expect to see more behind-the-scenes footage as well as more close-up product shots. Though some brands’ participation has been impeded by corporate approval processes, there’s no doubt — especially with the recent launch of video on Instagram — that short-form video will become a more central part of the fashion industry’s output.

As Cignoli advises: “Fashion brands just need to let go a little and enjoy Vine for what it is, the quickness and easiness of it. If they can find a way to do that, it’s going to be much more beneficial even if what’s going out isn’t always the most amazing piece of content.”

Do you have any favorite fashion brands you follow on Vine?

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Comment social media technology

#SXSW Interactive in prep: a fashionable playing ground for 2013

FashionBrainBar_SXSW_main

If there was one thing I learnt from SXSW last year, it was that I absolutely had to go again in 2013. On top of the fact it’s the place to hear industry leaders  give expert insights, the place to learn about new innovations and source fresh inspirations, and the place where trends and directions for the tech world break… it’s also a breeding ground for incredible networking.

For anyone working within the fashion-meets-digital space, this seems especially the case this year, with more attendees headed to Austin from our industry than ever, as well as a host of relevant events to go with it.

Fashion’s Collective is hosting one of them, known as the Fashion Brain Bar on Monday, March 11 (as pictured above). It’s aim is to provide a bit of respite from the insanity of the festival, but also a space for everyone to meet the people they need to meet and have “the conversations that will play a key role in the advancements we’ll see over the next few years”.

Industry experts on hand will include Raman Kia, executive director of integrated strategy at Condé Nast through to Dave Gilboa, founder of Warby Parker. The full list can be seen here, as well as a space to submit questions to them in advance.

Another fringe event planned is called The Neighborhood. Created by AvecMode and 2nd Street District, it’s a move on from the Style X event of previous years, which brought a fashion focus (complete with runway shows) to Austin nearer the end of the festival. This time plans are in place from March 11 – 14 with a bit more of an industry edge. There are pop-up stores still, but also Q&A sessions with pros from the likes of Neiman Marcus, Michael Kors, Lyst, Refinery29 and more, as well as highlight interviews with menswear designers John Varvatos and Billy Reid.

The main SXSW schedule does of course feature a number of fashion-specific events too, including this one with Nina Garcia focused on the democratisation of high fashion. And this one featuring New York’s “digital it-crowd” in Aliza Licht, Cannon Hodge, Erika Bearman and John Jannuzzi (that’d be DKNY, Bergdorf Goodman, Oscar de la Renta and Lucky Magazine).

Fashion’s Collective has also published a survival guide to the whole five days, including must-attend events (lots of them non-fashion which I would highly recommend, there’s nothing like being inspired from outside your normal remit), as well as a handful of food and drink recommendations (indispensable).

I also love this guide from Andrew Hyde, called Ditch the Marketers, Find the Makers, it sums up the rest of the experience beautifully (be friendly to everyone, sit down when you can, put down your tech and look at people – yes really).

On that note mind you, if you’re going, drop me a line over Twitter. Assuming I can connect, I’d love to meet you.

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social media Uncategorized

Vine scores big with #NYFW crowd

If there’s one thing to note this New York Fashion Week it’s the enormous number of posts being shared on Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine.

Brands, media houses and industry personalities alike are getting into the habit, capturing six-second scenes from around the venues, backstage at the shows and of the collections on the catwalks themselves. Some of the big names include Victoria Beckham, Marc Jacobs, Oscar de la Renta, DKNY, Bergdorf Goodman, the CFDA, KCD, Glamour, Lucky, Elizabeth Holmes of the WSJ, Nina Garcia, Coco Rocha, Man Repeller and the list goes on…

It’s an obvious move for an industry that trades predominantly on visuals. Both Instagram and animated GIFs have been huge for exactly that reason, but the former was static and the latter too complicated to quickly create. Add them roughly together however and the result is something that shows fashion in all its glory – with movement and in real, raw detail. Better yet of course with Vine, in an instantly shareable format too.

“Vine is a big idea, yet it is a simple one—the two basic ingredients for a successful emerging technology recipe,” Raman Kia, Condé Nast Media’s executive director of digital strategy told Fashionista. “It is no wonder that some brands are quick to jump in and experiment with it. This is especially true of fashion brands which have often been amongst the first to experiment with emerging social media platforms.”

On Twitter, Amy Odell of Buzzfeed asked at the beginning of fashion week: “Are runway photos even worth tweeting anymore?? (Kimberly Ovitz) #nyfw pic.twitter.com/VS1wLOfv.” Model Coco Rocha replied: “@amyodell the only worthwhile means of sharing the runway this season is Vine.”

It’s still early days however, with certain refinements including sound, zoom and drafts needed on the platform. There are likely developments to come on what people opt to post too – the endless finale shots from fashion week have become somewhat repetitive for instance, albeit successful when from a good angle. (Note my attempt at better quality by cheating with the live-stream of marc by Marc Jacobs above).

Either way, expect to see a lot more in this space. In the meantime, here are a handful of the highlight Vines from #NYFW so far:

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digital snippets e-commerce Uncategorized

Digital snippets: adidas, Garance Doré and Kate Spade, Bergdorf’s, Hipstamatic

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

  • adidas builds on Olympic success with ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’ Team GB video (as above) [The Drum]
  • Super blogger Garance Doré launches collaborative collection with Kate Spade [Vogue.co.uk]
  • Bergdorf Goodman’s online push [WWD]
  • adidas creates sneakers that display real-time tweets [PSFK]
  • W magazine partners with iPhone photography app Hipstamatic [Mashable]
  • Faces of NYFW aggregates real-time data from fashion week [Fashion Notes]
  • The potential of e-commerce in China [MaoSuit]
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digital snippets film Uncategorized

Digital snippets: Selfridges, Karl Lagerfeld, Bergdorfs, Nike, Mr Porter, Gap

Some more great stories from around the web surrounding all things fashion and digital over the past week:

 

  • Selfridges launches The Film Project with Alexander McQueen (as above), Comme des Garçons, Dries Van Noten, Gareth Pugh, A.F. Vandervorst and Rick Owens [Karl is my Unkle]
  • Karl Lagerfeld launches new content-driven website [WWD]
  • Bergdorf Goodman partners with magazine app Zite to push brand-relevant lifestyle content [Marketwire]
  • Mr Porter launches global augmented reality fashion hunt [Mashable]
  • Nike showcasing ‘future of retail’ with pop-up Nike+ FuelStation in London [Creativity Online]
  • Gap launches new campaign integrating geo-fencing technology [PSFK]
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mobile technology Uncategorized

And the Fashion 2.0 Awards winners are…

Best Twitter – @DKNY

Best Facebook – Bergdorf Goodman

Best Blog by a Fashion Brand – DKNY PR Girl

Best Website – Marc Jacobs

Best Mobile App – ?Tiffany & Co Engagement Ring Finder

Best Online Video – ?Prada spring/summer 2011

Next Big Thing in Tech – Instagram

Top Innovator ?- Kate Spade

Fashion 2.0 Visionary Award – Alexis Maybank and Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, co-founders of Gilt Groupe

Read about Norma Kamali’s keynote speech, here

(image courtesy of @KateSpadeNY)

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Christmas 2011: the best fashion videos

From Bergdorf’s pups, to Harvey Nichols’ walk of shame, here are my top ads from across the fashion space for the festive season…

Bergdorf Goodman’s Unleashed – a tale of true doggy heaven, and perhaps the cutest take on Christmas ever:

Kate Spade’s Give Colorfully – a fun spot based on gift wrapping all shapes and size:

Tommy Hilfiger’s House Par-tay – festive fun at home with The Hilfigers, which despite being on repeat play in the back of every New York taxi cab for the past month, is still enjoyable to watch:

Harvey Nichols’ Turn a Walk of Shame into a Stride of Pride – an amusing twist on Britain’s booze culture:

Tiffany & Co’s Some Holidays Are Unforgettable – a celebration of true love featuring Nat King Cole’s The Very Thought of You:

And finally, I couldn’t help but add in Apple’s festive spot for the iPhone 4S, featuring Santa and his new pal Siri:

Be sure to also check out the ones from John Lewis, Loewe, Harrods and Macy’s.

Merry Christmas all!

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Uncategorized

The fashion brands already on Google+

H&M on Google+

So we all know Google+ launched its brand pages this week. And we all know there’s a ton of commentary flying around as to whether companies should actually get involved or not.

But while we’ve been talking about it; others have been doing it, the fashion industry included.

According to Google’s blogpost announcing ‘Pages’ officially, Burberry, H&M and Macy’s were the first fashion partners.

In little over 24 hours however, numerous more have jumped on board. It’s a case of the usual suspects, and many of them don’t have any content on as yet, but here’s a list of some of them so far in anycase:

Be sure to note how dynamic the Burberry and Kate Spade pages look with the animated gifs they’ve added, and check out the pictures below for some of the first posts:

Burberry's Christopher Bailey gave a video introduction to Google+ (click to watch)
ASOS jokes about how quiet things are on Google+
Macy's introduces its new Google+ page
Kate Spade uploads a new profile picture to its Google+ page
Uniqlo welcomes everyone to its new Google+ page

 

Have you found more? Please add them to the comments below…