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Mango’s latest trend campaign goes social media-heavy

mango campaign
Mango AW16 campaign

Mango has released details of its latest monthly trend ‘campaign’, adding that it will be upping its social media commitments with this particular launch.

The retailer, which earlier this year moved to a monthly trends model and away from a two-seasons one, has given details of the first of its four AW16 trend stories that will launch globally at the end of August. It features Roos Abels and Lexi Boling on the streets of New York.

Part of the campaign has been revealed on the brand’s Snapchat and Instagram (@mango) channels, with a live broadcast of previously unseen footage from the shoot, which also reveals key garments being featured by Mango during the first month of the upcoming season.

In addition, the brand will launch its official Spotify channel in late August, which will be updated each season with the songs featured in the Mango campaigns and stores, in order to create its own playlists.

The brand currently has close to 16.5m followers across all of its social media platforms.

This post first appeared on Trendwalk.net, a style-meets-business blog by journalist, trends specialist and business analyst, Sandra Halliday

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e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Shoppable content rules fashion week season, with Apple, Instagram and more as partners

Burberry Womenswear February 2016 Show Finale_002

The fashion industry is undergoing significant structural change; from the way it delivers its collections, to how it promotes them to both the industry and its consumers. Where traditionally there are big time lags between fashion week shows and the products then hitting the shop floor, increasingly there’s a race to get items into the hands of shoppers as fast as possible in order to capitalize on the hype the digital era has generated.

The whole debate is an intensely complex one, from the very nature of luxury down to how it affects multi-brand retailers, traditional buyers and more. From a logistical perspective it means big changes on the back-end in terms of manufacturing and supply chain timelines. While on the front end, it also means facilitating the purchases themselves in numerous new ways.

This consumer-facing part of the debate has so far been the one most explored. As brands including Burberry through to Rebecca Minkoff have announced their intentions to move to a real-time model, meaning you can see the collection in fashion week and buy it immediately (#seebuywear), they have introduced interesting tech-enabled initiatives to facilitate it. This is about more than just e-commerce pages made live in the moment after the show, or capsule collections hitting flagship stores (even if that does include newbies like Prada), and rather some valid digital partnerships that enhance the shopping experience.

The key thing here is the shift from designers putting budget into technology for the sake of it at fashion weeks, to rather spending on something that is going to impact the business from an ROI point of view. It’s about entertainment to drive conversions; not just engagement, likes and new followers.

There’s a lot for the industry to figure out in terms of making this a viable move across the board from the operational standpoint (and as yet little clarity as to how those who have said they’re doing it are structurally making that happen), but for now, there’s at least a willingness to experiment with what it looks like for consumers.

Head over to Forbes for an outline of those moves from the likes of Burberry, Rebecca Minkoff, Misha Nonoo and Temperley London.

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e-commerce Editor's pick film

Burberry show on Apple TV will celebrate united collection and shoppable plans

Burberry Womenswear February 2016 Show - Pre Show Imagery_001

Ahead of its move to an in-season show in order to meet consumer demand this September, Burberry is turning to Apple TV for an increasing focus on entertainment and conversions during London Fashion Week on Monday.

The British heritage brand will live stream its show on its Apple TV channel – as it did with its menswear show in January. This time however, it will also enable viewers to revisit and explore the collection using the Apple Remote thereafter, and use it to request a call from a dedicated customer service rep so as to pre-order select pieces.

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The show will also mark the first time that Burberry presents its womenswear collection under its united “Burberry” label, following the announcement that its Prorsum, London and Brit lines would be merged in November 2015.

The intention is to simplify the presentation of Burberry’s full product range, though it also suggests wider price points, and thus more accessible pieces will be shown in order to appeal to the digital audience it is reaching.

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Adding to the entertainment piece is British musician Jake Bugg, who will perform live during the show. The Burberry app for Apple TV also offers access to a back catalogue of Burberry Acoustic films from other British music talent, as well as highlights from previous runway shows and beauty tutorials with Burberry make-up consultant Wendy Rowe.

The new collection will then be on display in the brand’s Regent Street flagship store for a week following the show, before moving to the brand’s Faubourg Saint-Honoré store in Paris. Check out the trailer for the show, below:

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Editor's pick social media

Nick Knight to Insta-shoot Topshop’s #LFW show

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Topshop is teaming up with Nick Knight, founder of SHOWstudio.com, for live Instagram coverage during its upcoming London Fashion Week show.

The visionary photographer will shoot the “true atmosphere and unseen culture” of the Topshop Unique autumn/winter 2016 event at Tate Britain, and release the images in real-time to the brand’s 6.2 million Instagram followers.

This “Insta-shoot”, will cover everything from the setup through to the finale on show day (Sunday, February 21). The aim is to step away from the “ordinary, often ubiquitous documentation process” seen during fashion weeks, Topshop said in a statement.

It will also be possible to watch Knight in action by tuning into Periscope, where GoPro cameras will be broadcasting his creative process.

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Said Knight: “Fashion systems are developing so rapidly, and there are so many new and amazing possibilities. SHOWstudio has always championed change and innovation, so the challenge of posting real-time and live steaming from GoPro straight to Periscope is one we relish. SHOWstudio was also founded on the principal of championing fashion film and moving image, so we were delighted to accept Topshop’s offer to collaborate on capturing the Topshop Unique Show in the most dynamic way possible.”

Shoppers at the retailer’s flagship store at Oxford Circus in London will also be able to access a dedicated London Fashion Week area, and see a 3-D window installation by set designer Thomas Petherick.

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social media

From Gigi’s Snapchat to that InstaPit: all of Tommy Hilfiger’s digital #NYFW plans

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News of Tommy Hilfiger’s InstaPit and express Apple Watch line during New York Fashion Week may have hit the headlines already, but the all-American brand is also turning to multiple other digital strategies when its autumn/winter 2016 show takes place on Monday, Feb 15.

The 1920s nautical-themed collection will also herald the launch of the designer’s Snapchat in collaboration with supermodel Gigi Hadid and a dedicated GIF booth backstage. Here’s the complete lowdown on each of the plans:

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InstaPit: Tommy will install a dedicated Instagram Media Pit as a space for Instagrammers (we presume influential ones particularly) to shoot the show as it hits the catwalk. “The concept encourages a digitally-savvy approach to generating runway photography and reflects the brand’s ongoing vision to further democratize the show experience,” reads the statement. It is of course, also a smart move to ensure increased quality control on what’s being put out about the brand to the audiences that matter.

Snapchat: The brand’s Snapchat feed will launch in collaboration with Gigi Hadid, who has been announced as global brand ambassador for women’s apparel, footwear, accessories and fragrance. She will help provide unfiltered, real-time snaps – broadcasting the best of backstage, the rehearsal and final seconds before the event begins.

Apple Watch: Tommy is helping to launch the new GPS Radar Apple Watch app, which allows guests to access their show tickets, update RSVPs and scan into events. Any attendees with it downloaded ahead of the Tommy show will be able to access a dedicated “fast lane”, enabling them to skip the queue at the Park Avenue Armory venue. They’ll also get key imagery from the show, front row and backstage.

Animated GIFs: To echo the theme of the show, a 1920s-themed cinematographer will invite guests to have bespoke GIFs taken against the set. They’ll receive a link to share online, as well as an actual photographer to take away with them in real life. Meanwhile, a dedicated GIF booth backstage will invite models, guests and press to create their own bespoke animations to go out across Tommy’s Twitter and Weibo channels. They will also be able to share them themselves across Instagram, Facebook and WeChat.

The Conversation: The brand also continues with its live social media feed pulling in real-time content tagged #TommyFall16 from models, influencers and friends of the brand, on Tommy.com. It will be accompanied by a live-stream of the show, as well as further video content.

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Comment Editor's pick social media technology Uncategorized

From the archive: Digital do’s and don’ts for fashion weeks

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Fashion weeks may be undergoing a period of significant change at present, but for now, the same fundamental rules for marketers during New York, London, Milan and Paris, exist. How do you showcase your new collection to a digital audience in a way that stands out from the noise and resonates with relevant customers at the same time? And how do you keep their interest long enough that one day, they might actually go out and buy what they see?

Here then, is a look back at a piece that first appeared from us in Campaign US a year ago: a list of 11 do’s and don’ts to help you:

Don’t post weak visuals. This is rule No. 1 for fashion week, a time when Instagram and Twitter are overwhelmed with blurry photos and videos of models as they walk past the front row. No one cares about mere proof that you were there; but they do care about Fashion Week more broadly, so give them something they can’t otherwise see. If you want engagement, think more like Dolce & Gabbana instead: a brand that consistently delivers beautiful still and motion imagery, real time or otherwise. With today’s devices, there’s no excuse for anything but. The more candid, docu-style assets belong (and work) on SnapChat, so put them there.

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Do think beyond the “like.” What are you actually trying to achieve during Fashion Week? This is one of the noisiest times of the year in this industry, so be prepared to put the legwork in to be able to get the sort of numbers you want out. Your first challenge, therefore, is figuring out exactly what your objectives are, and accepting the fact they may be different from what you usually push for. Are you looking to build awareness? Drive traffic? Increase brand affinity? Or actually influence conversions? Apply your answer to the channels you use.

Do determine the channels most suited to your brand. Just because it’s a noisy time of year, don’t feel like you have to jump on every channel because you can, and whatever you do don’t just blind spray the same content across them all. Facebook needs to be different from Pinterest, which needs to be different from Instagram, and as already mentioned, really different again from Snapchat. And you’ll need to consider video, too. If resources are limited, use them wisely by prioritising which of the big platforms are right for your consumers. Who are you trying to reach, and where are they? It’s worth remembering much of the online Fashion Week crowd won’t be your current customers, but they could be your future ones; targeting them could be quite a different move, so think through how best to capture their attention.

Don’t be scared to experiment. As much as it’s sensible to have a strong base strategy going into Fashion Week, it’s also a time ripe for experimentation. Take risks by trying out new channels and thinking about what you could do on some of the more niche ones. In the past, Fashion Week has seen some great campaign work on the likes of Spotify by Zac Posen, Skype by Victoria Beckham, and WeChat by Burberry. Expect Snapchat to continue as the platform making the greatest splash this season. But if something just doesn’t work for you, step away from it. The beauty of digital is being forgiven and forgotten very quickly — so cut your losses and refocus your efforts elsewhere.

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Do think about what will stand out. Snapchat will of course only get you so far. If brand awareness is your goal, then press coverage is key. If you’ve got the resources, go big by considering true innovation. Sometimes it might be seen as a gimmick, but it works. Fendi is a strong example. In February 2014 it introduced drones flying above its Milan Fashion Week show, recording the models as they walked out and beaming that footage back in real time to fans watching at home. The quality was terrible, but every major press outlet reported on it.

Do take advantage of organic content about your brand. If you’re directly involved with Fashion Week, it’s quite likely a lot of content will be generated on your behalf. Use it! Chanel has frequently been one of the most hashtagged fashion brands on Instagram, which helped it generate an enormous 2.4 million followers via @chanelofficial before it even posted any of its of its own content on there. (It finally did for the first time in October 2014.) Retweet or regram your influencers, integrate their posts into your own digital assets, and strive to push that advocacy further.

Don’t forget to interact with your fans. Social media is not a one-way channel, but it’s still very much considered so by many designer brands. Fashion Week is an ideal time to break that code and interact more regularly with existing and aspiring consumers. Rebecca Minkoff is a great brand to look at for inspiration. It took the idea of direct engagement a step further in 2014 by involving Instagram fans in a critical decision related to the show: which of two looks would walk the runway. It was an incredibly simple post featuring two shots side by side with the opportunity for followers to vote. It worked.

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Do partner with influencers. Beyond the reposts and the interactions, think about setting up more strategic relationships with influencers in the space. They don’t have to be bloggers; perhaps they’re Instagram artists or Pinterest stars. Tommy Hilfiger in September 2014 introduced what it referred to as its “First Timers” campaign, giving access to a group of digital influencers from outside the fashion industry. Experts from the worlds of music, art, floristry, travel and architecture were all invited. This season, it’s introduing an “Instapit” for Instagram users. Tumblr also runs a scheme every season that sees up-and-coming artists and photographers on its channel, taken on tour throughout Fashion Week; they hit some of the big shows, meet the designers and enhance their own networks. Open up your space to influential outsiders.

Do back all of this with budget. Free only goes so far these days. Partnerships take money. Content takes money. Most important: If you really want to target specific sets of customers, boosting your presence with real media spend is what makes all the difference. Think about doing so in real time, reacting to what is working and getting behind it to push it further.

Do think beyond the moment. It’s easy to get carried away during Fashion Week in a bid to keep up with what everyone else is doing. The amount of incredible visual assets at your disposal certainly helps, but don’t forget about what that means for your digital profile the rest of the year. Brands that enjoy the best engagement are the ones that maintain the quality, volume and velocity of Fashion Week long after the live stream. Look to Victoria’s Secret for inspiration: Its annual show has become an entertainment property in its own right, and the content it surrounds it with is equally commendable.

Or maybe… Don’t bother. If you’re not already an integral part of Fashion Week — set up with a scheduled slot for your show or presentation — consider how necessary it is to bid for relevance. Yes, there are opportunities for digital engagement, but it’s even easier to just get lost in the noise entirely. If you have something to launch, truly consider a different time of year before you use up valuable resource — not only might your consumers pay more attention, but so will others in the industry.