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mobile social media

Anya Hindmarch introduces digital art app inspired by 8-bit graphics

PIX by Anya
PIX by Anya

British designer Anya Hindmarch has launched an app tied to her autumn/winter 2016 collection focusing on pixelated artwork.

The PIX by Anya mobile experience, invites fans to share in the collection’s inspiration of “8-bit graphics and the origins of digital art” by distorting their own images.

Users can upload and convert their shots into an artistic blur created of circles, squares, triangles or cubes. There are four different pixel styles to choose from, each “pinchable” to adjust the pixel size. Needless to say, selfies are proving popular.

PIX by Anya
PIX by Anya

The interactive app asks users to share the #PIXbyAnya hashtag with their resulting artwork. In addition to the app’s main function, other features include inviting the user to read about the collection, watch a stream of the AW16 runway show, peruse collection images and connect to the online store.

The collection itself (as below) features innovative leatherwork techniques such as heat-fusing and leather marquetry to showcase the “building blocks of digital design”. Moving beyond simple mosaics, designs include famed characters from first generation arcade games such as Space Invaders and Pacman, not to mention an overarching striking resemblance to Tetris.

In speaking on the collection as a whole, Hindmarch says it “explores the development of artificial consciousness and poses the question, do computers dream when they sleep?”

PIX by Anya
Anya Hindmarch AW16
PIX by Anya
Anya Hindmarch AW16
Categories
data mobile

Digital artwork visualises data trends from Grabble’s mobile commerce

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Data has its place front and centre at this week’s Millennial 20/20 Summit in London with a live projection tracking real-time info pulled from shopping app Grabble.

Created as a piece of art in collaboration with digital studio Holition, the visualisation tracks the £50m worth of items saved into people’s digital wishlists in the app over the last seven days.

Much like a similar project between Holition and Lyst in 2014, trends are identified ranging from key shopping times through to differences between male and female consumers.

Peak “grabbing” time on Grabble for instance is late Sunday afternoon, when a quarter (26%) of the week’s saves into the wishlists are made. Pre-work grabbing is most popular with women, who particularly like to do so at 8am, while men by comparison tend to do their grabs (65% of them) at 9pm at night.

grabble - holition data

All of this is brought to life in the digital artwork by pink (female) and blue (male) dots – further demonstrating such ideas like men being more willing to buy from retailers they already know, by the fact they’re clustered around well-known names. Women in contrast are more randomly spread across brands, including smaller ones, illustrating they are more experimental in their shopping and open to using the app as a means of discovery.

As Dan Murray, co-founder at Grabble, says: “We see at least 1m interactions per day through the app but with Holition’s help, we’ve been able to transform dots and dashes into a stylish and engaging piece of art. It’s not only aesthetically appealing but will be useful for the many retailers we work with in helping them visualise the buying patterns of our audiences at different times of the day/week.”

Check out the video, below: