Categories
film social media

John Lewis calls for GIFs focused on “moving forward” in ongoing #JL150 anniversary campaign  

jl150

John Lewis is continuing the celebrations for its 150-year anniversary with a crowdsourced GIF campaign.

Created to accompany its new TV ad dedicated to British history, the initiative invites fans to submit their own animated images or videos of up to 15-seconds in length, showing how they’re “always moving – dancing, running, learning new things”.

That concept ties to its tagline for the whole campaign: “For 150 years you’ve never stood still. Neither have we.”

Entries can be submitted via Tumblr, Google+, Instagram, Facebook or Twitter using the #JL150 hashtag up until May 30. A winner will be picked at random and awarded £1,500 of JL vouchers; a further £150 of vouchers will be given to their favourite entry each week.

The company has also launched its own #JL150 Tumblr page housing numerous versions of its own GIFs (examples below) – some of the pulled from the TV ad and others showcasing the commemorative products created for the anniversary in collaboration with some of Britain’s most loved brands and designers.

Check out the John Lewis Facebook page too for news on further celebrations in-store, as well as a content series dedicated to different decades.

jl150-babyjl150-handbags jl150-girls jl150_product1 jl150-exercisejl150-toaster

Categories
data digital snippets e-commerce film social media Startups

Digital snippets: Gap, H&M, L’Oréal, Dove, Lyst, Jelly

Here’s a highlight of the best stories in the fashion and tech space over the past week…

Gap_PinterestGIF

  • You can now pin animated GIFs: here’s Gap’s (as pictured) [Fashionista]
  • Will David Beckham’s H&M Super Bowl ad be #covered or #uncovered? [Fashionotes]
  • L’Oréal’s Matrix offers stylist’s-eye view with Google Glass [BrandChannel]
  • Dove launches short film, “Selfie”, about women’s self-image at Sundance [Creativity]
  • Meet the stylish Sapeurs, the Congolese stars of Guinness’ new ad and doc [Co.Create]
  • Why Amazon’s data store doesn’t scare people, but Facebook’s does [AdAge]
  • Lyst, a fashion e-commerce aggregator, raises $14m more, plans beacon rollout with PayPal [TechCrunch]
  • Keep.com helps you shop for items on Instagram [Mashable]
  • Nine unexpected ways retailers are using your data [Fashionista]
  • Vogue hosts its first Google+ Hangout celebrating The Fashion Fund [Vogue]
Categories
film social media Uncategorized

Paul Smith partners with artist Kate Moross for #LFW Vine clips

Another example of how to use Vine to beautiful effect has just come in from Paul Smith. The British designer has partnered with London-based artist Kate Moross, who is shooting a series of imaginative six-second clips in the run up to tomorrow’s London Fashion Week show.

The first, called BLINDS and shown above, sees shutters opening and closing on the Paul Smith logo. Others so far, and as below, have been titled REFLECT and INFINITE, hinting at the venue and print and pattern respectively,

“We’re drawing influence from the themes and palette of the collection revealing glimpses of what’s to come in Sunday’s catwalk show,” said Moross. “The format is so immediate, all professional video tools are off limits, instead we’re creating animations, loops and video effects using colour filters, miniature lenses and simple objects.”

You might also like:

Matthew Williamson to magnify intricate garment detail in #LFW Vine strategy

Vine scores big with #NYFW crowd

Take a look at Calvin Klein’s Vine posts during Super Bowl XLVII

Categories
social media Uncategorized

Matthew Williamson to magnify intricate garment detail in #LFW Vine strategy

Matthew Williamson - MatthewMagnified

Vine might have been the big hit at New York Fashion Week, but the majority of posts lacked somewhat in the innovation, quality or insight department. Monotony was the main issue as six-seconds of finale or panning audience shots were uploaded one after the other at every show.

Here’s a heads up then – the Matthew Williamson show in London is set to approach it with much more in the way of a strategy. Known for his intricate handcrafted garments, the designer will use Vine as a means of showcasing details up close to real, raw and beautiful effect, as introduced by the designer here (and see below). As the models head down the runway on Sunday, February 17, animated backstage shots by photographer Sean Cunningham (of Burberry Tweetwalk fame) will be posted to Twitter that zoom and magnify in on the embellishment and beadwork in a bid to bring followers a more detailed view than those on the front row.

The concept takes its inspiration from Williamson’s #MatthewMagnified campaign on Facebook, which uses the Pic Jointer app (as above) to show still catwalk images alongside close-up detail shots of the fabric.

Here’s what Rosanna Falconer, head of digital for the designer, had to tell me about their plans:

“#MatthewMagnified has been hugely successful for us, our most popular campaign but also what we really wanted to drive home about the brand; it shows and conveys the luxury of Matthew, which you just can’t find on the high street.

We were trying to think of how to do this in a dynamic way for our show at London Fashion Week. We’re working with photographer Sean Cunningham who has created incredible GIFs in the past for Burberry and SHOWstudio, but we wanted to find something unique for Matthew. Sean got incredibly inspired by #MatthewMagnified, and the idea of an animated image that zooms in and shows the detail.

So we came up with our own kind of animated GIF concept, which is about being able to see closer than the front row. The issue was finding the ideal tech to show it, and Vine really was that. Better yet, being able to show over Twitter really made it all very achievable; it’s one very simple step.

Sean started having a play with it, and has created some beautiful work already. I love the way it’s such raw footage; the idea of it being Cinéma vérité, which is a French term for true-to-life documentary filmmaking. Rather than being a final polished campaign image, it’s what’s going on right now, live from backstage. It’s really special being able to capture that. Six seconds is the perfect length too – from full look to the magnified detail. Our attention span is getting ever shorter and these quick clips will show the catwalk condensed in its raw, backstage form.

We’re trying to give our followers better than ever access with a real, up-close quality. In many ways, it’s like a digital version of the go-see, which are the appointments made by press and buyers after the show to view the collection in greater detail. It’s the beadwork, the detail and the craftsmanship of the product right there.

It’s also not about tech for tech’s sake. I’m a great believer in only using digital innovation where it’s a good brand fit and not just for the sake of it because something is new and hip. Obviously everyone is speaking about Vine, but the important thing here is that we’re using it with an established campaign, the most successful thing we’ve been doing on social so far, and a concept we’ve been wanting to take further. We were looking for the means to do so and it’s a happy coincidence that this came together with Twitter so well.”

The show takes place on at 6pm GMT on Sunday, February 17. Follow @MWWorld on Twitter, search for him via Matthew Williamson on Vine, and watch out for the hashtag #MatthewMagnified.

Categories
social media Uncategorized

Vine scores big with #NYFW crowd

If there’s one thing to note this New York Fashion Week it’s the enormous number of posts being shared on Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine.

Brands, media houses and industry personalities alike are getting into the habit, capturing six-second scenes from around the venues, backstage at the shows and of the collections on the catwalks themselves. Some of the big names include Victoria Beckham, Marc Jacobs, Oscar de la Renta, DKNY, Bergdorf Goodman, the CFDA, KCD, Glamour, Lucky, Elizabeth Holmes of the WSJ, Nina Garcia, Coco Rocha, Man Repeller and the list goes on…

It’s an obvious move for an industry that trades predominantly on visuals. Both Instagram and animated GIFs have been huge for exactly that reason, but the former was static and the latter too complicated to quickly create. Add them roughly together however and the result is something that shows fashion in all its glory – with movement and in real, raw detail. Better yet of course with Vine, in an instantly shareable format too.

“Vine is a big idea, yet it is a simple one—the two basic ingredients for a successful emerging technology recipe,” Raman Kia, Condé Nast Media’s executive director of digital strategy told Fashionista. “It is no wonder that some brands are quick to jump in and experiment with it. This is especially true of fashion brands which have often been amongst the first to experiment with emerging social media platforms.”

On Twitter, Amy Odell of Buzzfeed asked at the beginning of fashion week: “Are runway photos even worth tweeting anymore?? (Kimberly Ovitz) #nyfw pic.twitter.com/VS1wLOfv.” Model Coco Rocha replied: “@amyodell the only worthwhile means of sharing the runway this season is Vine.”

It’s still early days however, with certain refinements including sound, zoom and drafts needed on the platform. There are likely developments to come on what people opt to post too – the endless finale shots from fashion week have become somewhat repetitive for instance, albeit successful when from a good angle. (Note my attempt at better quality by cheating with the live-stream of marc by Marc Jacobs above).

Either way, expect to see a lot more in this space. In the meantime, here are a handful of the highlight Vines from #NYFW so far:

Categories
social media Uncategorized

Take a look at Calvin Klein’s Vine posts during Super Bowl XLVII

As promised, Calvin Klein made use of Twitter’s new video-sharing app, Vine, during the Super Bowl last night.

Designed to support the premier of its Calvin Klein Concept men’s underwear campaign during the first quarter of the game, the six-second Vine content consisted of various different shots of model Matthew Terry working out in his boxers.

What was clever was the simple Super Bowl-themed copy that accompanied – “Game time”, “Fighting it out in the 4th”, and “Touchdown” included. So too was there a nice use of #SuperBowl and #SB47 hashtags throughout.

Below is a selection of them. Scroll to the bottom for the full ad too…