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Editor's pick film sustainability

Stella McCartney’s latest campaign spotlights landfill waste

Stella McCartney's autumn/winter 2017 landfill campaign
Stella McCartney’s autumn/winter 2017 landfill campaign

Stella McCartney, long known for her focus on sustainability, has set her latest campaign in a Scottish landfill site in an attempt to highlight the issues of overconsumption within modern society.

Shot by Harley Weir, the images and accompanying film for autumn/winter 2017, are captured against a backdrop of waste to demonstrate how single use and disposable items are wreaking havoc on our environment.

“The idea we had with this campaign is to portray who we want to be and how we carry ourselves; our attitude and collective path. Our man-made constructed environments are disconnected and unaware of other life and the planet which is why there is waste,” McCartney explained.

In a social media post, the brand added: “Our planet’s waste problem is now so severe that 300 million tons of plastic is created every year, half of which is for single use – wreaking havoc on our environment and the majority ending up in landfill and our oceans. With this campaign, against the striking contrast of landfill we explore the reality of unnecessary waste and aim to inspire action as well as salute the human efforts to care for our planet.”

Models Birgit Kos, Iana Godnia and Huan Zhou can be seen lying on a discarded car or amid the heaps of waste in the ads, questioning what we are leaving behind for future generations. In the film, they lip-sync to a song by Australian rapper Tkay Maidza. Artist Urs Fischer added illustrations to the imagery.

The write-up for the campaign continues: “We stand by our commitment to being a responsible, sustainable brand. Throughout the new collection we use innovative and recycled materials such as organic cotton, sustainably-sourced viscose, recycled nylon and cruelty-free Skin-Free-Skin. We are continually trying to lessen our impact on the environment. It is expected that plastic production will triple by 2050 when the population explodes to almost 10 billion – so it is vital that we act now.”

Stella McCartney's autumn/winter 2017 landfill campaign
Stella McCartney’s autumn/winter 2017 landfill campaign
Stella McCartney's autumn/winter 2017 landfill campaign
Stella McCartney’s autumn/winter 2017 landfill campaign
Categories
business digital snippets e-commerce social media Startups technology

What you missed: Virtual reality Window Wonderland, Amazon Go, free shipping and free returns

Google's Window Wonderland virtual reality tour
Google’s Window Wonderland virtual reality tour

Amazon, Google and Snapchat are the three top tech companies to look at for key stories over the past couple of weeks (and potentially the whole of 2016 in fact). From the launch of Amazon Go, which enables shoppers to just walk out of a shop while their phone handles payment, to the virtual reality “Window Wonderland” holiday tour Google has organised from a bevy of US stores – it’s all about more convenient as well as heightened experiential retail. Meanwhile, lots of brands are starting to experiment with Snapchat’s Spectacles too.

Also worth checking out from this past fortnight are a double-whammy of reports on free shipping and free returns, lots more about the uptake of chatbots, and a deep-dive on what the fashion world faces against the rise of extremism, populism and protectionism.


TOP STORIES
  • Thanks to Google, you can now take a VR tour of New York’s holiday window displays [Ad Week]
  • What Amazon Go means for the future of retail [AdAge]
  • Fashion world faces new normal [BoF]
  • Free shipping is a lie [Fast Company]
  • ‘Free’ returns aren’t free [The Atlantic]

BUSINESS

SOCIAL MEDIA
  • Lush staff hit back at viral tweet with hilarious video [Stylist]
  • American Eagle Outfitters uses Snapchat Spectacles to film influencer ads in Hong Kong [The Drum]
  • Macy’s mixes shopping with social video to launch its holiday campaign [Ad Week]
  • Hype vs discovery: lessons from the Spectacles rollout [Loose Threads]
  • While we weren’t looking, Snapchat revolutionised social networks [NY Times]

MARKETING
  • Christmas ads deliver few real gifts for retailers, poll suggests [The Guardian]
  • How Target is taking control of programmatic [Digiday]
  • How chatbots will revolutionise holiday shopping [The Drum]
  • CoverGirl’s influencer chatbot is smart, funny and responsive [AdAge]

RETAIL
  • Experiential retail is key to Boohoo’s US expansion [Glossy]
  • Adidas just opened a new kind of store – and Nike should be terrified [Business Insider]

TECHNOLOGY
  • Has voice control finally started speaking our language? [The Guardian]
  • Rag & Bone takes on virtual reality with Google [WWD]
  • Is your T-shirt clean of slavery? Science may soon be able to tell [Reuters]
  • Technology can’t get rid of your cheap used clothes [Motherboard]

START-UPS
  • Amazon announces Alexa Accelerator to boost conversational commerce start-ups [Retail Dive]
Categories
business data e-commerce Editor's pick social media

Bushy eyebrows and $50k per day on Facebook ads: How a small beauty brand blew up

Wunderbrow_ANCHOR

If you’re female, aged anywhere between 25 and 60, and based in the UK or perhaps the US, it’s entirely likely you may have been targeted on Facebook by an eyebrow product called Wunderbrow of late.

If not there, perhaps you’ve read an online editorial about it, spotted it on the London Underground, seen it in various print magazines, or even watched it on television. You may additionally have noticed it popping to the top of the best-seller lists in its category on Amazon.

Riding the crest of a key beauty trend for prominent eyebrows (driven largely by celebrities like Cara Delevingne and her own bushy pair) this small, relatively unknown brand has been steadily and consistently maximising paid media in a bid to drive user acquisition for just over a year.

Head over to Forbes to read the full story about how a $50,000 per day Facebook spend, coupled with savvy native advertising, has helped it grow 30-fold as a business in just over a year.

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Comment Editor's pick

Tips and tricks for surviving #CannesLions

In no place is the saying ‘burning the candle at both ends’ truer than at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. Especially if you’re a first timer.

With a week full of back-to-back meetings, endless high profile speakers, multiple Oscar-worthy award ceremonies, and enough parties, networking opportunities and bottles of rosé to sink any one of the hundreds of glamorous super yachts you will likely not be able to get on, the eternal quest for sleep is a futile one…

But why exactly would we want to do that anyway and risk missing the very best of this century’s Mad Men in their finest hour? Yes, you can expect to see ad land behaving badly, but so too will you feel you’ve just learnt, absorbed and experienced the very best of it all within the space of a week, not to mention in the luscious surrounds of the French Riviera.

By the end you’ll never be happier to go home again, but you’ll probably also want to come back next year. So here are some tips and tricks to help you get through it.

Cannesbeach

Take your prep with a pinch of salt

You’ll want to make a plan before you arrive. Know what’s ahead of you, whether it be seminars to attend or meetings to book. Figure out your game plan, RSVP to what you need to (bear in mind there are a lot of additional bits of content going on all day everyday up and down La Croisette, and nearly every hotel beachfront has a sponsored party each night), but don’t expect to keep to everything.

There’s a lot to be said at this type of event for getting swept up with a crowd and going with the flow. It often ends up just as fortuitous. Word of warning however: be careful trying to sneak around the front of a party by way of the ocean – a guard dog or two might be there to greet you. I learnt that the hard way.

It’s ok to be the keen one

One of the enormous benefits of Cannes Lions is that the content each day is of such curated high quality. With big name speakers like Sir Tim Berners-Lee and Pharrell Williams however, you’re not going to be alone in wanting to attend, so ensure you get there early. It’s even worth arriving for the session before to be safe.

Believe me, some of the experiences you gain you’ll speak about for life (anyone else remember Yoko Ono in 2010?), so these are the plans you should stick to, even if the sun is gloriously shining (let’s hope) and calling you back outside. Take some snacks and sit it out. Seriously, do take snacks, and a sweater to fend against the air conditioning.

Network on rosé

Once all is said and done each day, there are happy hours galore to choose from. If you’re not into rosé however, you might want to think again about heading to Cannes.

Then again, if you have never tasted the rosé in Cannes, I guarantee you it tastes better than any other you’ve ever tried. I’ve heard people wax lyrical in the past about something to do with temperature, locality and the size of the bottle they order (it’s not unusual to see ones the size of small children paraded about with sparklers coming out the top), though I’m pretty sure it’s far more a product of the situation. Either way, you’ll quickly learn to accept it.

Similarly you’ll need to accept that the place to drink it is on the Carlton Terrace. It might be a mess pit of hundreds of people, making it feel like a slightly more formal version of a fresher’s party, but it’s the only place to head.

The masses flock thereafter just around the corner to the Gutter Bar. Expect lots of advertising guys flaunting their Lions around like it gives them dating prowess, and yes more rosé on tap, but the best networking of my life was also here post 2am. Safe to say, it’s almost impossible to be the last one standing, though everyone gives it a good try.

GutterBar

Suck up the long hours

Given how busy every location is and how late each night gets, expect to be on your feet for a lot of it. Ladies, don’t even bother packing any heels. In fact, unless you’re fortunate enough to be staying in one of the hotels along La Croisette, don’t assume you’ll get to go home from the moment you leave your accommodation each morning (or afternoon). You’ll be a sweaty mess by nightfall, but no one will judge you for it.

On a plus note, all the bathrooms are beautiful in Cannes (apart from some of the beach ones) so it’s easy to freshen up if you throw some bits in your bag. Men, that goes for you too.

Don’t book early appointments

Seriously, just don’t. No one ever shows up other than perhaps on their first day, and cancellations over and over again get tiresome. Let’s face it, you’d rather be in bed too. Anything post 3pm is probably safest.

Bring the corporate card

That rosé I keep mentioning is in endless supply in Cannes, but needless to say so therefore are the credit card expenses. You will spend a lot of money while you’re there – it’s not unusual for a bottle of water to set you back 14 euros at the Gutter Bar and a slice of pizza in the region of 20 euros (honestly it’s often cheaper just to get the rose!)

If you’ve got a limit, eat and drink before you get there. Or better yet, buddy up with someone else with slightly looser purse strings. Rumour has it the ad industry is pretty good at that sort of thing.

If all else fails…

If you’ve gone hard, but you haven’t got as much content as you needed to and your boss back home is expecting a rundown of what was what, hotfoot it to my daily sundowner sessions on the beach. I’ll be chatting highlights from the festival at 5pm Sunday-Thursday (4pm on Monday) with David Davies, managing director of content at Lions Festivals, hosted by Time Inc CEO Joe Ripp. We’ll cover all the action from each day, the key talking points and the emerging common themes.

In short, you can consider this your Cannes cheat sheet. Needless to say, feel free to stick around for a rosé with me after too…

This post first appeared on The Drum

Categories
Editor's pick film

Storytelling insights anchor Gap’s Dress Normal short film series

Gap_dressnormal

Gap has enlisted Oscar-nominated director David Fincher for a series of ads tied to its Dress Normal campaign for autumn/winter 2014/15.

Four spots have been released that play on a sense of narrative – teasing the viewer that they’re catching a snippet of a story, featuring everything from a soaking wet woman getting undressed in the back of a car, to a man dashing up a huge set of winding stairs to meet a woman at the top.

The third sees a couple making out in an apartment block while the female peers at herself in the mirror, and the final one is based on a dancer and a golfer.

Gap’s global CMO Seth Farbman, said: “What I wanted, because this is Gap, was positive anxiety — that was the brief. We wanted to make it more challenging than what people think of as a Gap commercial. Rather than a beginning, a middle and end of the story, we wanted to tell part of the story and leave a sense of wonder.”

Created by agency Wieden & Kennedy, New York, the black and white ads see taglines including: “The uniform of rebellion and conformity.” And: “Simple clothes for you to complicate.”

The campaign will span outdoor, mobile, direct, social, in-store and digital. The print ads were shot by Glen Luchford and star celebs including Anjelica Huston, Elisabeth Moss and Zosia Mamet in a series of vignettes.

Fincher is director of tales including Panic Room, House of Cards, Fight Club and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Read more about the Gap campaign strategy over at Advertising Age.

Categories
digital snippets e-commerce social media technology

Digital snippets: H&M, Instagram, Uniqlo, Ferragamo, Urban Outfitters, Nike

Happy new year all and welcome to 2014!

It’s straight to Vegas for me and headfirst into CES for what’s looking set to be a week heavy on the wearables front. More of that to follow, but for now, here’s a highlight of some of the fashion and tech stories you may have missed over the past couple of weeks…

david-beckham-underwear_HM

  • H&M and Beckham return to The Super Bowl with ground-breaking shoppable TV ad campaign [WGSN]
  • Instagram reveals ‘promising’ results of Levi’s and Ben & Jerry’s ad trial [Marketing Magazine]
  • Ferragamo weaves founder’s history into fairy tale film [Luxury Daily]
  • Nike, MTV are top global brands on Instagram in 2013 [BrandChannel]
  • How in-store analytics is changing the way you shop [Fashionista]
  • Beacons: What they are, how they work, and why Apple’s iBeacon technology is ahead of the pack [Business Insider]
  • What fashion adds to the tech world: Vanessa Friedman on wearables [FT]
  • Smart eyelashes and fingernails: the next wave of wearable tech [Mashable]
  • Can Apple’s Angela Agrendts spark a retail revolution? [Fast Company]
Categories
e-commerce social media

Digital Marc Jacobs ads invite users to reserve SS14 collection

MarcJacobs5_SS14

While the majority of designers are pushing their current season collections through online banner ads at present – Diane von Furstenberg, Etro, Valentino, Calvin Klein and Louis Vuitton included – Marc Jacobs is focusing on spring/summer 2014.

The US brand is taking advantage of the fact content on sites like the New York Times’ style pages this month is based on fashion weeks in New York, London, Milan and Paris. Rather than pushing for direct conversions therefore, its campaign showcases a shot from its recent show (and next season’s line); beneath it inviting consumers to reserve the look.

Its a clever move to encourage clicks, and ultimately capture consumer data, including email addresses.

The banner leads through to a lookbook on the MarcJacobs.com site featuring the entire show in still shots and in video form. Each of the looks can be shared over social media (Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, The Fancy, Svpply and Google+), as well as reserved – opting to do so calls for users to fill out a form that will notify them when the item they’re interested in is available to buy.

Screenshots below show the path of the initiative:

MarcJacobs_NYTimes_SS14 MarcJacobs2_SS14MarcJacobs3_SS14MarcJacobs4_SS14

Categories
Comment social media

Could this be the year fashion makes its mark at Cannes Lions?

CANNES_LIONS_FLAGS2

There was a great article written by Rei Inamoto, chief creative officer of AKQA, for AdAge last year about why Cannes Lions, the international festival of creativity – otherwise known as advertising’s biggest global awards – trumps SXSW in terms of content.

“At events like SXSW, there is a lot of information. And information can become useful knowledge for marketers. However, what really moves people is inspiration. And that’s where Cannes keeps its edge for marketers. While SXSW may be about informing and finding that Next Big Thing, Cannes’ focus has been about pushing this industry of ours forward,” he says.

It reflects my own sentiments exactly. I’m well versed in both, but Cannes likewise wins for me* largely because of both the curation and the quality of its content. This is the place where true leaders come together to share not only best in class work, but overarching ideas and thoughts for the future of this space.

It’s a week where inspiration is utterly abound (alongside copious vats of rosé of course). Speakers over the last couple of years have spanned former US president Bill Clinton, Malcolm Gladwell, Robert Redford, Sir John Hegarty, Alain de Botton, Patti Smith, Aaron Sorkin and more.

Yet it’s SXSW that the fashion industry has managed to get a good grip on in terms of its relevance to them – all manner of luxury brands and major retailers have been in attendance these past couple of years, as I’ve previously covered, to source both content and opportunities for partnerships within the largely tech-focused world. Of course at SXSW there are now huge volumes of agency folk too, and at Cannes an increasing number of technology companies.

Two years ago I wrote this article about the significant lack of fashion presence throughout Cannes. It focused on the fact that fashion communications remained largely about print ads selling product over campaigns selling ideas, a viewpoint I still hold at large, but certainly one that is beginning to shift. In doing so, it’s sparking more relevance than ever for these brands to start making an appearance at Cannes, both on the delegates list and in those nominated for awards.

The great news is, 2013 looks like the year that might take shape.

Just announced is news that Burberry CCO Christopher Bailey will take to the stage on the Friday of the festival (it runs from June 16-22) to talk about “digital’s creative revolution” with Google’s head of marketing, Lorraine Twohill. From the write-up, as well as prior news from Google, that event will be the kick off for another impressive digital project from the brand.

Burberry is one of a number, alongside adidas and Volkswagen, involved in Google’s Art, Copy & Code initiative, a follow-up to its Project Re-Brief last year. This is “a series of projects and experiments to show how creativity and technology can work hand in hand”.

The write-up for the session at Cannes adds: “How do you engage your audience when ad views are voluntary? What happens when the physical and digital worlds intersect? How can data enable creativity? What if ads didn’t have to look or feel like ads? The only way to find the answers is through risk taking and experimentation.”

[Side note here as to Google’s subtle but increasing infiltration into the fashion industry across all aspects of its business – way beyond just search].

Elsewhere at Cannes there are other fashion types in attendance too – Vivienne Westwood speaking with SapientNitro to “de-construct the narrative behind some of the most innovative stories of all-time”, and photographer Annie Leibovitz as part of a panel discussing the “genesis, evolution and continued success of the global ‘Disney Dream Portraits Series’.”

Watch this space…

And do also keep an eye out for the free daily live-streams being offered from the festival for the first time this year… there will undoubtedly be some good ones to choose from.

*Full disclaimer: I am employed by the same parent company as Cannes Lions. My opinion would stand regardless.