Fruit of the Loom releases city-wide stunt for unnoticeable underwear

Fruit of the Loom

Fruit of the Loom has launched a campaign stunt that highlights how light its underwear is by testing how much passersby are paying attention to their surroundings in New York City.

In support of the brand’s new EverLight™ underwear, the brand has created physical installations around the city that blend into the urban setting, purposively designed to be unnoticeable.

Examples included a typical tourist telescope pointed at a brick wall and a small red door reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland that was located so closely to the ground few would notice it. Those who spot the initiative and take the time to stop and look can discover hidden clues leading them to a reward of cash prizes and free underwear.

Those clues include using very small writing to hide behind a large chunk of incoherent sentences, or a larger-than-life QR code that has to be scanned to reveal the location of the prize.

While the brand was not sure what to expect, it was right in its assumption of low noticeability. Of the nine million citizens of New York, only six savvy people have taken the time to engage with the advertising and interpret the clues. The six winners have each taken home $1,851 in cash, which, in another tongue-in-cheek move from the brand, corresponds to the year that it was founded, as well as free EverLight™ underwear.

While the campaign is ongoing, a video released by the brand chronicles not only the reactions of passersby, but tone that implies that the project is as much a social experiment as an advertising stunt.

With a total of 11 installations, and with only six that having been completed, the brand is now encouraging people in New York City to watch out for a poster of a realtor that looks a little bit off, a newspaper ad for a broken printer, and a little red man waving its arms.

This all follows a larger move from Fruit of the Loom for taking a humorous approach to promoting its brand at present. In May this year, it also released a satirical PSA against shiftless selfies, explaining that men were taking their tops off so often because they weren’t wearing the right t-shirts.