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Editor's pick sustainability technology

London store upcycles 60,000 plastic bottles into 3D-printed interior

If you’re battling through the crowds on Regent Street in London this holiday season, you might want to stop and take a look at a small, but interesting new store opening called Bottletop.

Bottletop's 3D-printed flagship store in London
Bottletop’s 3D-printed flagship store in London

If you’re battling through the crowds on Regent Street in London, desperately seeking some inspiration this holiday season, you might want to stop and take a look at a very small, but very interesting new store opening called Bottletop.

Located at the southern end of the busy road – nearest to Piccadilly Circus – it stands out first and foremost for the Kuka robot in its store window; a 3D-printing mechanical arm that is live-producing all manner of bag charms and keyrings for shoppers stopping in.

Inside, however, things only get more fascinating. In partnership with AI-Build, and using the more industrial-sized Kuka robots, the team has also begun to 3D print the interior design itself. Using Reflow filament, which is made entirely from plastic waste, the result is a repetitive three-dimensional pattern across the ceiling and down each of the walls.

As you read this, different segments are still being produced. When I was there last week, the design was only partly underway (the render above shows it in its full form). The conclusion will incorporate 60,000 upcycled plastic bottles. Head over to Forbes to read the rest of the story, including insight from the Bottletop founders on their aims with the store.

By Rachel Arthur

Rachel Arthur is Editor-in-Chief of Current Daily, the leading news source for fashion, retail and innovation, and the co-host of its weekly Innovators podcast. She otherwise serves as Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Current Global, a transformation consultancy driving growth within fashion luxury and retail. By background she is an award-winning business journalist and consultant, contributing to titles including Wired, Forbes and Business of Fashion.