Calvin Klein proves value of video for conversions

The launch of the all-new Push Positive Bra from Calvin Klein was its single-best (for a bra) in the brand’s history and it sounds like its video campaign starring Lara Stone dancing to Salt-n-Pepa’s Push It, is why.

According to a story focused on video as a strong measure of ROI in WWD yesterday, the 32-second ad from last August has had 10.9m views to date and garnered more than 450m impressions. Importantly, during the time of the campaign, calvinklein.com saw a 30% increase in overall traffic and a 385% increase in referral traffic from YouTube.

Ad dollars behind the spot undoubtedly helped – the brand took over YouTube’s homepage in 10 markets, including Singapore, Taiwan and Korea, and placed the ad in-stream on multiple other YouTube videos through the site’s TrueView advertising system.

The audience retention rate for the video – meaning those who watched the whole segment rather than clicking away – was well above the industry standard too, at over 80%. Its men’s Concept underwear spot, which first aired during the Super Bowl this February, meanwhile, also saw a retention rate of over 85%.

Calvin Klein CEO, Tom Murry, said: “As a brand, video has not only been integral to our overall communications strategy but also a part of the brand identity. We see YouTube as the natural place to house and curate our digital video content… [It’s] an impactful way to reach and interact with our audience through multiple touch points — desktop, tablet and mobile.”

According to WWD, video is proving to be the most powerful digital medium for reaching consumers in a measurable way. Importantly it’s also proving a killer option for the fashion and retail space in terms of driving conversion. Statistics from YouTube and research firm Compete show four in 10 consumers visit a store either online or in person as a direct result of watching a video online. This shopper also tends to be a retailer’s most valuable customer: 28% of those who watched a retailer’s online video spent more than $500 on apparel in the past six months, while only 2% of non-video watchers did.

Maureen Mullen, L2’s director of research and brand advisory, added that video is now a “way to push consumers further down the purchase funnel”.